78 Professional Membership Organizations for Mental Health Workers

A list of membership associations for mental health counselors, psychotherapists, social workers, psychologists, psychiatrists, specialists, etc., including ACA/APA divisions and international organizations

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This is a list of 78+ professional membership organizations for mental health clinicians and specialists. It includes the divisions of the American Counseling Association (ACA) and the American Psychological Association (APA).

For additional resources for mental health professionals on this site, see Must-Read Books for Therapists and Resources for Mental Health Professionals.


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Professional Membership Organizations for Mental Health Professionals

National (United States)

  1. American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry
  2. American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
  3. American Academy of Clinical Psychology
  4. American Academy of Forensic Psychology
  5. American Academy of Psychodynamic Psychiatry and Psychoanalysis
  6. American Art Therapy Association
  7. American Association for Community Psychiatry
  8. American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy
  9. American Association of Christian Counselors
  10. American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors and Therapists
  11. American Association of Suicidology
  12. American Board of Forensic Psychology
  13. American Board of Professional Psychology
  14. American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology
  15. American Clinical Social Work Association
  16. American Counseling Association
  17. American Dance Therapy Association
  18. American Group Psychotherapy Association
  19. American Institute of Stress (AIS)
  20. American Mental Health Counselors Association
  21. American Music Therapy Association
  22. American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children
  23. American Psychiatric Association
  24. American Psychoanalytical Association
  25. American Psychological Association
  26. American School Counselor Association
  27. American Society of Addiction Medicine
  28. American Society of Clinical Hypnosis
  29. American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology
  30. American Society of Group Psychotherapy and Psychodrama
  31. American Sociological Association
  32. Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies
  33. Association for Comprehensive Energy Psychology
  34. Association for Contextual Behavioral Science
  35. Association for Death Education and Counseling
  36. Association for Family Therapy and Systemic Practice
  37. Association for Play Therapy
  38. Association for Psychological Science
  39. Association for Transpersonal Psychology
  40. Association for Women in Psychology
  41. Association of Black Psychologists
  42. Association of Humanistic Psychology
  43. B.F. Skinner Foundation
  44. Christian Association for Psychological Studies
  45. Cognitive Neuroscience Society
  46. Cognitive Science Society
  47. Comparative Cognition Society
  48. Experimental Psychology Society
  49. Federation of Associations in Behavioral & Brain Sciences
  50. Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry
  51. National Association for Addiction Professionals
  52. National Association for Children’s Behavioral Health
  53. National Association for Poetry Therapy
  54. National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis
  55. National Association for Rural Mental Health
  56. National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers
  57. National Association of Christian Counselors
  58. National Association of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapists
  59. National Association of Forensic Social Work
  60. National Association of Social Workers
  61. National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors
  62. National Board for Certified Counselors
  63. National Council on Family Relations
  64. National Education Association
  65. National Hypnotherapy Society
  66. National Latinx Psychological Association
  67. North American Drama Therapy Association
  68. North American Society of Adlerian Psychology
  69. North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity
  70. Professional Association of Christian Counselors and Psychotherapists
  71. Psychometric Society
  72. Society for Neuroscience
  73. Society for Personality Assessment
  74. Society for Police and Criminal Psychology
  75. Society for the Improvement of Psychological Science
  76. Society of Experimental Psychologists
  77. Society of Experimental Social Psychology
  78. Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology
American Counseling Association (ACA) Divisions
American Psychological Association (APA) Divisions

Canada

UK & Ireland

Australia & New Zealand

European Organizations

International Organizations & Associations


Group Therapy: A Comprehensive Resource Guide

A resource guide for group facilitation

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Initially, the idea of group therapy terrified me. What if I couldn’t “control” the group? What if a client challenged me? What if I couldn’t think of anything to say? What if everyone got up and walked out? – which actually happened, once, by the way.

What made group counseling especially intimidating was that if I “messed up,” an entire group of people [as opposed to one person] would witness my failure.

Group facilitation wasn’t always comfortable and I made many (many!) mistakes, but I grew. I realized it’s okay to be counselor and human; at times, humans say dumb stuff, hurt each other’s feelings, and don’t know the answer.

By letting go of the need to be perfect, I became more effective. Group facilitation is now one of my favorite parts of the job.


This resource guide provides practical information and tools for group therapy for mental health practitioners.

Image by StockSnap from Pixabay

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Group Therapy Guidelines

Group therapy is an evidence-based treatment for substance use and mental disorders. An effective group calls for a skilled clinician to meet treatment standards. Professional associations, such as the American Group Psychotherapy Association, develop best practice guidelines based on scientific data and clinical research.

Want to learn more about current best practice in group work?

Association for Specialists in Group Work: Best Practice Guidelines 2007 Revisions

American Group Psychotherapy Association

Are you a therapist, social worker, or peer support specialist who provides group counseling services?

Additionally, SAMHSA promotes research-based protocols and has published several group therapy guides for best practice, including TIP 41: Substance Abuse Treatment: Group Therapy, Substance Abuse Treatment: Group Therapy – Quick Guide for Clinicians, and Substance Abuse Treatment: Group Therapy Inservice Training (a training manual), in addition to group workbooks/facilitator guides for anger management, stimulant use disorder, and serious mental illness.


Book Recommendations

The book itself is small in size but packed with helpful information and creative ideas. As a new counselor lacking in clinical skills, I supplemented with activities to engage the clients. Group Exercises for Addiction Counseling never failed me.


A more recent discovery of mine. This guide provides detailed instructions accompanied by thought-provoking discussion questions for each intervention. I was impressed with both the quality and originality; an instant upgrade to “house-tree-person.”

Textbooks

AuthorTitleYear Published
Corey, M, Corey, G., & Corey, C.Groups: Process and Practice
2018
Yalom, I., & Leszcz, M.The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy2015

(For additional book recommendations, see Resources for Mental Health Professionals and Must-Read Books for Therapists.)

Icebreakers & Activities

You only have to Google “icebreakers” and you’ll have a million activities to choose from. I’m not listing many, but they’re ones clients seem to enjoy the most.


Fun Facts

My favorite icebreaker activity involves passing out blank slips of paper to each group member and instructing them to write a “fun fact” about themselves, something no one else in the group would know. I provide them with examples (i.e. “I once had a pet lamb named Bluebell” or “I won a hotdog eating contest when I was 11 and then threw up all over the judges’ shoes”).

Depending on the crowd, you may want to tell clients not to write anything they wouldn’t want their peers to know. (I adopted this guideline after a client wrote about “sharting” himself.) Once everyone has written something, have them fold their papers and place in a container of some sort (a gift box, paper bag, plastic bowl, etc.) Group members take turns passing around the container (one-at-a-time) and picking a slip to read aloud. They must then guess who wrote it. (I give three guesses; after that, I turn it over to the group.)


Icebreaker Question Cards

A similar but more structured activity is to write out questions ahead of time and have clients take turns drawing and answering the questions. Questions can be silly, thought-provoking, or intending to illicit a strong emotional response (depending on the audience and goals for the group).


People Search

“People Search” involves a list of traits, feats, talents, or experiences. Each client receives the list and is given x amount of time to find someone in the group who is a match; that individual will then sign off. The first person to have their list completely signed sits down; they win. I typically let clients continue to collect signatures until two additional people sit down.

(Prizes optional, but always appreciated.) During the debriefing, it’s fun to learn more (and thereby increase understanding and compassion).


First Impressions

“First Impressions” works best with group members who don’t know each other well. It’s important for group members to know each other’s names (or wear name tags). Each group member has a sheet of paper with various “impressions” (i.e. judgments/stereotypes). For example, items on the list might be “Looks like an addict” and “Looks intelligent.” Clients write other group members’ names for each impression. In addition to enhancing a sense of community, this activity provides an avenue for discussing harmful stereotypes and stigma.


Affirmations Group

Affirmations groups can be powerful, generating unity and kindness. The effect seems to be more pronounced in gender-specific groups. There are a variety of ways to facilitate an affirmations group, ranging from each person providing an affirmation to the client on their right to individuals sharing a self-affirmation with the group to creating a self-affirmation painting. Another idea is to give each client a sheet of paper. (Consider using quality, brightly-colored paper/posterboard and providing markers, gel pens, etc.) Clients write their name on it and then all the papers are passed around so each group member has the opportunity to write on everyone else’s sheet. Once their original paper is returned to them, they can read and share with the group. This can lead to a powerful discussion about image, reputation, feeling fake, etc. (Plus, clients get to keep the papers!)


Most Likely & Least Likely to Relapse

“Most Likely to Relapse/Least Likely to Relapse” works best with a well-formed group and may require extra staff support. It’s good for larger groups and can be highly effective in a therapeutic community. Clients receive blank pieces of paper and are tasked to write the names of who they think is most likely and least likely to relapse. After writing their own name on the sheet, they turn it in to staff (effectively allowing staff to maintain a safe and productive environment). Staff then read each sheet aloud (without naming who wrote it). If they choose, clients can share what they wrote and provide additional feedback. (Most do.) Clients selected as “most likely” (in either category) have the opportunity to process with other group members and staff.


Access more group therapy worksheets and handouts here.

Additional Group Activities

Psychoeducation & Process Groups

In need of fresh material? It can be easy to fall into a rut, especially if you’re burnout or working with a particularly challenging group. The following three PDF downloads are lists of ideas for group topics.

Additional Ideas for Psychoeducation & Process Groups

Practical Tips for Psychoeducation & Process Groups

As a group facilitator, consider incorporating some sort of experiential activity, quiz, handout, game, etc. into every session. For example, start with a check-in, review a handout, facilitate a discussion, take a 5-minute bathroom break, facilitate a role-play, and then close the group by summarizing and providing clients with the opportunity to share what they learned.

If an experiential or interactive exercise isn’t feasible, provide coffee or snacks; sitting for 45 minutes is difficult for some, and 90 minutes can be unbearable.

Another idea is to have a “fun” or “free” group in the curriculum. Ideas include going bowling, having a potluck, Starbucks run, game group (i.e. Catchphrase, Pictionary, etc.), escape room, nature walk, etc.

Dealing with Challenges

Clients are not always willing therapy participants; some are court-ordered to attend or there to have privileges restored. Some attendees may be there “voluntarily,” but only to save their marriage or keep a job, not believing they need help. In residential treatment, clients attend mandatory groups as part of the daily schedule — participate or you’re out.

Even when attendance is truly voluntary, a group member may be in a bad space. Maybe they’re stressed about the rent or just got into a fight with their significant other. Or what if the AC is broken and the group room is 80 degrees? What if a client has unpleasant body odor or bad breath or an annoying cough?

Multiple factors combine and it’s suddenly a sh**show. (I’ll never forget the client who climbed onto a chair to “rally the troops” against my tyranny.) Anticipating challenges is the first step to effectively preventing and managing them.


Click here for a helpful article from Counseling Today that addresses the concept of client resistance.

Tips for Dealing with Challenges

1. If possible, co-facilitate. One clinician leads while the other observes. The observer remains attuned to the general “tone” of the group, i.e. facial expressions, body language, etc.

2. Review the expectations at the beginning of every group. Ask clients to share the guidelines with each other (instead of you telling them). This promotes a collaborative spirit.

3. After guidelines are reviewed, explain that while interrupting is discouraged, there may be times when you interject to maintain the overall wellness and safety of the group. (Knowing this, a client is less likely to get angry or feel disrespected when/if it happens.)

4. If you must interrupt, apologize, and explain the rationale.

5. Avoid power struggles at all costs, especially when a client challenges the benefits of treatment. (The unhealthier group members will quickly side with a challenger, leading to a complaint session.) Challenging the efficacy of treatment (or you as a clinician) is often a defense mechanism. Sometimes, the best response is simply “okay,” or none at all… and keep moving. You can also acknowledge the client’s perspective and ask to meet with them after group (and then get back on topic). If the group is relatively healthy, you may want to illicit feedback from other group members.

6. If a client becomes angry or tearful, give them time to vent for a moment or two (don’t “Band-Aid”); they may be able to self-regulate. (If they do self-regulate, share your observations and offer praise.)

7. If a client’s anger escalates to a disruptive level, ask them to take a break. At this point, their behavior is potentially triggering to other group members. Don’t raise your voice or ask them to calm down. Direct them step out and return when they’re ready. You may have to repeat yourself several times, but remain firm and calm, and they will eventually listen.

8. If a client is disrespectful (cursing at you or another client, name-calling, insulting, etc.) while escalated, let them know it’s not okay, but don’t attempt to provide feedback. (A simple, “Hey, that’s not okay,” will suffice.) Bring it up with the client later when they’re able to process.

9. Once the disgruntled client exits the room, acknowledge what happened and let the group know you will follow up with the client. If another client wants to talk about it, ask them to share only how it made them feel, but stress that it’s not okay to talk about an absent group member. (“How would you feel if we talked about you when you weren’t here?”) Strongly suggest that they wait until the person returns (and is open) to have a group discussion.

10. After a major blow-up (and once everyone is calm), it can be beneficial for the group to process it with the person who escalated. Group members can empathize/relate, share their observations and/or how it made them feel, and offer feedback.

11. If other disruptive behaviors occur in group (side conversations, snoring, etc.) address them in the moment (without shaming, of course). Point out the behavior and explain how it’s disruptive to the group. Refer back to the group guidelines. Ask group members to comment as well. If you let a behavior persist, hoping it will eventually stop, you’re sending the message that it’s okay, not only to the person who is disruptive, but to the entire group. This impacts the integrity of the group and opens things up for additional disruptive behaviors.

12. For clients who monopolize, who are constantly joking, or who attempt to intentionally distract by changing the topic, point out your observations and encourage group members to give feedback.

13. If, on the other hand, clients seem disengaged or unmotivated, seek out their feedback, privately or in the group, whichever is clinically appropriate.

14. If there’s a general level of disengagement, bring it up in the group. Remain objective and state your observations.

15. Anticipate that at times, people may not have much to say. (And while yes, there’s always something to talk about, that doesn’t mean someone is ready to or has the emotional energy to.) Maybe they’re distracted or tired or feeling “talked out.” It’s good to have backup plans: watch a psychoeducational film, take a walk in the park, listen to meditations or music, provide worksheets, education reading material, or coloring sheets.

16. Always keep in mind a client’s stage of change, their internal experiences (i.e. hearing voices, social anxiety, paranoia, physical pain, etc.), external circumstances (i.e. recent medication change, loss of housing, conflict with roommates, etc.), and history of trauma. What looks like resistance may be something else entirely.

Professional Group Therapy Organizations

Academic Articles

Online Articles

Additional Links


My Group Guide is a great tool for those who do not have the time to find worksheets/handouts for their clients, group activities, and other resources. 

Helpful resources and links for group psychotherapy from the Sacramento Center for Psychotherapy, including an online forum.

This blog provides some links and book chapters on various topics related to the study of groups. You can also find teaching resources related to group dynamics. 


This site provides free resources for managers, entrepreneurs, and leaders. Much of the content on facilitation and teams is applicable to group facilitation.

The Center provides a unique method of group training. Principles and techniques are based on the theory that the group is a powerful agent of change.

SCTRI is an non-profit organization with members from all around the world that supports training and research in the systems-centered approach.