Sites with Free Therapy Worksheets & Handouts

(Updated 5/4/20) A list of sites with free printable resources for mental health clinicians and consumers

By Cassie Jewell, M.Ed., LPC, LSATP

If you’re a counselor or therapist, you’re probably familiar with Therapist Aid, one of the most well-known sites providing free printable worksheets. PsychPoint and Get Self Help UK are also great resources for cost-free handouts, tools, etc. that can be used with clients or for self-help.

When I started blogging, I realized just how much the Internet has to offer when it comes to FREE! That being said, I’ve learned the term free is often misleading. There are gimmicky sites that require you to join an email list in order to receive a free e-book, PDF printables, etc.; I don’t consider that free since you’re making an exchange. I also dislike and generally avoid sites that bombard with ads. A third “free-resource” site that’s deceiving is the site with no gimmicks or ads, but turns out to be nothing more than a ploy to get you to buy something.

For this post, I avoided misleading sites and instead focused on government agencies, educational institutions, and nonprofits. I found some sites that offered a variety of broad-topic PDF resources and others that had fewer, but provided specialized tools. See below for links to over 50 sites with free therapy worksheets and handouts for both clinicians and consumers.

(Click here for free worksheets, handouts, and guides posted on this site.)

Please check back frequently; I update regularly.

Mental Health & Addiction (Sites with Worksheets/Handouts on a Variety of Topics)

91 Free Counseling Handouts | Handouts on self-esteem, emotions, recovery, stress, and more

A Change in Thinking: Self-Help Library | A large collection of worksheets and handouts on communication, relationships, depression, and more

A Good Way to Think: Resources | Worksheets and handouts on happiness, well-being, values, etc.

Articles by Dr. Paul David | Clinical handouts on depression, relationships, substance use disorders, family issues, etc.

ASI-MV Worksheets & Handouts | Addiction and recovery handouts

Belmont Wellness: Psychoeducational Handouts, Quizzes, and Group Activities | Printable handouts on assertiveness, emotional wellness, stress management, and more

Black Dog Institute: Clinical Resources | Download fact sheets, handouts, mood trackers, and more on a variety of mental health topics

Brene Brown: Downloads and Guides | Resources for work, parenting, the classroom, and daily life

Bryan Konik | Therapist & Social Worker: Free Therapy Worksheets | A collection of worksheets on stress management, anxiety, relationships, goal setting, and trauma

Cairn Center: Resources | A modest collection of printable assessments, handouts, and worksheets on DBT, anxiety, depression, etc.

Client Worksheets from Treatment for Stimulant Use Disorders (Treatment Improvement Protocols Services) | 44 client worksheets on addiction and recovery

Cornell Health: Fact Sheet Library | A variety of handouts and tracking sheet on various health topics; only a few relate to mental health and addiction

Daniel J. Fox, Ph.D.: Forms, Presentation Slides, and Worksheets | Topics include anger, emotions, borderline personality disorder, etc.

DOWNLOADS from Get Self Help | Free therapy worksheets and handouts on a variety of topics

Dr. Danny Gagnon, Ph.D., Montreal Psychologist: Self-Help Toolkits | Articles and handouts on worry, depression, assertiveness, etc.

EchoHawk Counseling: Materials and Resources | Articles, worksheets, and handouts on a variety of topics (boundaries, emotions, grief, stress, trauma, etc.)

Eddin’s Counseling Group: Worksheets | A short list of free worksheets and handouts

Faith Harper: Worksheets and Printables | A small collection of therapy worksheets and handouts, including a gratitude journal

Forward Ethos: Guide Sheets | Worksheets on mindfulness, anxiety, self-care, intimacy, relationships, and more

Free Stuff for Consumers and Professionals | A short list of downloads (Source: Jonathan S. Abramowitz, Ph.D.)

InFocus Resources | Family handouts on addiction

Lynn Martin | A short list of client handouts, including questionnaires

Mark R. Young, LMSW, LCSW (Resolving Concerns): Links & Forms | Links to factsheets, worksheets, assessments, etc.

Mental Health CE | Course content handouts on a variety of mental health topics

Motivational Interviewing Worksheets

My Group Guide: A Collection of Therapy Resources

Oxford Clinical Psychology: Forms and Worksheets | A large collection of therapy worksheets based on evidence-based practices

Peggy L. Ferguson, Ph.D.: Addiction Recovery Worksheets | A modest collection of handouts/worksheets for addiction and recovery

PsychPoint: Therapy Worksheets

Self-Help Exercises from Gambling Therapy

Self-Help Reading Materials | Links to handouts on self-help topics (Source: Truman State University)

Self-Help Tools from Mental Health America | Links to assessments, worksheets, handouts, and more

Sleep and Depression Laboratory: Resources | A small collection of worksheets related to sleep, worry, and depression

SMART Recovery Toolbox | Addiction and recovery resources

The Stages of Change | A 7-page PDF packet (Source: Virginia Tech Continuing and Professional Education)

Step Preparation Worksheets | (Source: treatmentguide4u.com)

Substance Abuse | A 13-page PDF packet

Taking The Escalator: Therapy Tools | Handouts on addiction and recovery

Therapist Aid | Free therapy worksheets

Therapy Worksheets | A therapy blog with links to free worksheets on various mental health topics

Tools for Coping Series | A large collection of handouts on coping skills

Worksheets from A Recovery Story (Blog) | A small collection of addiction and recovery worksheets

Depression, Stress, & Anxiety

Alphabet of Stress Management and Coping Skills | Coping skills for every letter of the alphabet

Anxiety 101 | An 11-page PDF packet (Source: Michigan Medicine | University of Michigan)

Anxiety Canada: Free Downloadable PDF Resources | Anxiety worksheets for parents and self-help

Behavioral Activation for Depression | A 35-page packet

Coping with Anxiety and Panic Attacks: Some Cognitive Behavioural Self-Help Strategies | A 10-page packet

Creating Your Personal Stress Management Plan | A 10-page packet

Dr. Chloe: Worksheets for Anxiety Management | A small collection of worksheets and handouts

Panic Attack Worksheets (Inner Health Studio) | A 9-page PDF packet

Relaxation | A 15-page packet on relaxation skills for anxiety

Stress Management (Inner Health Studio) | A 5-page packet on stress management

UMASS Medical School Department of Psychiatry: Stress Management – Patient Handouts | A collection of handouts on stress management. Some of the other sections, including “General Health and Wellness” and “Nutrition” have links to handouts as well

Trauma & Related Disorders

Center for Sexual Assault & Traumatic Stress: Therapist Resources | More than just worksheets: client handouts, assessments, info sheets, toolkits, training resources, links, etc.

Child and Family Studies: Sex in the Family | An 8-page packet on shame and guilt in relation to child sexual abuse

Common Reactions to Trauma | A 1-page PDF handout

Detaching From Emotional Pain (Grounding) | A 12-page PDF packet (Source: Sunspire Health)

Grounding Exercises | A 2-page PDF handout

Grounding Techniques | A 1-page PDF handout from JMU Counseling Center

Grounding Techniques | A 2-page PDF handout

Healing Private Wounds Booklets | Religious handouts on healing from sexual abuse

Seeking Safety Resources | Printable worksheets on PTSD, substance abuse, and healthy relationships

Selected Handouts and Worksheets from: Mueser, K. T., Rosenberg, S. D., & Rosenberg, H. J. (2009). Treatment of Postraumatic Stress Disorder in Special Populations: A Cognitive Restructuring Program | A 13-page PDF packet

Trauma Research and Treatment: Trauma Toolkit A small collection of trauma handouts

Traumatic Stress: The Effects of Overwhelming Experience on the Mind and Body | A 12-page PDF packet (Source: Dan Metevier, Psy.D., Clinical Psychologist)

Wisconsin Hawthorn Project: Handouts & Worksheets | Handouts in English and Spanish

Psychosis

CBT for Psychosis & Trauma Handouts

Early Psychosis Intervention: Client Worksheets | Scroll down to the “Client Worksheets” section for links. Use with clients who are experiencing psychosis

Goal-Setting Worksheet for Patients with Schizophrenia | A 3-page PDF

List of 60 Coping Strategies for Hallucinations | A 2-page PDF

Treatment for Schizophrenia Worksheet Pack | A 6-page PDF packet

ACT, CBT, & DBT

ACT Mindfully: Worksheets, Book Chapters & ACT Made Simple | ACT worksheets and other free resources

Cognitive Therapy Skills | A 33-page packet

Carolina Integrative Psychotherapy | A small collection of DBT worksheets and handouts

Clinician Worksheets and Handouts: Clinician Treatment Tools | A variety of CBT, DBT, etc. therapy worksheets

CPT Web Resources | A short list of worksheets and handouts

DBT Peer Connections: DBT Handouts and Worksheets | DBT resources

DBT Self-Help | Printable lessons and diary cards

Dr. John Forsyth: Free Resources | Download two free packets of worksheets (ACT and mindfulness)

Living CBT: Free Self-Help | 20+ CBT worksheets

Lozier & Associates: Dialectical Behavior Therapy Printables – DBT Worksheets and DBT Handouts | A small collection of DBT handouts and worksheets

Printable Versions of CPT/CBT Worksheets | English and Spanish worksheets (Source: The F.A.S.T. Lab at Stanford Medicine)

Veronica Walsh’s CBT Blog: Free Downloadable Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Worksheets/Handouts | Print/use these worksheets only with blog author’s permission

Grief & Loss

Activities for Grieving Children | A 7-page PDF

Bereavement Handouts (Hospice & Palliative Care) | A small collection of handouts

The Center for Complicated Grief: Handouts | Assessments, handouts, and guides

A Child’s Understanding of Death | An 11-page packet

Handouts to Download and Print: One Legacy | Handouts on grief and loss

Loss and Grief Handouts

Loss, Grief, and Bereavement | A 35-page PDF packet

Grief Factsheets: My Grief Assist

Printable Grief and Loss Resources | A fairly extensive collection of printable handouts on grief and loss

Anger

Anger Inventory | A 7-page PDF packet

Anger Management | A 13-page PDF packet

Anger Management Techniques | A 4-page PDF

Dealing with Anger (Inner Health Studio) | A 7-page PDF packet

Free Anger Management Worksheets: Letting Go of Anger | A small collection of worksheets for anger management

Getting to Know Your Anger | A 42-page PDF packet

Love To Know: Free Anger Worksheets | 7 downloadable anger management worksheets

Steps for Change: Anger Management Worksheets

Self-Esteem

Confidence Activities | A 25-page PDF packet

Free Self-Esteem Worksheets

Growing Self-Esteem: Self-Esteem Worksheets

Improving Self-Esteem: Healthy Self-Esteem | A 10-page PDF packet

Self-Esteem Activities | A modest collection of handouts/activities for self-esteem

Self-Esteem Experts: Self-Esteem Activities | Printable handouts on self-esteem

Self-Esteem Printable Worksheets

Spiritual Self-Schema Development Worksheets: Yale School of Medicine

Values & Goal-Setting

10 Free Printable Goal-Setting Worksheets (from Parade)

Core Values and Essential Intentions Worksheet | A 2-page PDF worksheet

Core Values Clarification Exercise | A 4-page PDF worksheet

Core Values Worksheet | A 4-page PDF worksheet

Life Values Inventory | A 5-page printable PDF (Source: Brown, Duane and R. Kelly Crace, (1996). Publisher: Life Values Resources, pinnowedna@charter.net)

Personal Values Card Sort | A 9-page printable PDF (Source: W.R. Miller, J. C’de Baca, and D.B.Matthews, P.L., Wilbourne, University of New Mexico, 2001)

Values | A 2-page PDF worksheet

Values and Goals Worksheet | A 1-page PDF worksheet

Values Assessment Worksheet | A 2-page PDF worksheet

Values Exercise | A 2-page PDF worksheet

Values Identification Worksheet | A 6-page PDF worksheet (Source: Synergy Institute Online)

Values Inventory Worksheet | A 2-page PDF worksheet

What Are My Values? | A 4-page PDF worksheet from stephaniefrank.com

Children & Youth

A Child’s Understanding of Death | An 11-page packet

A Collection of Anger Management/Impulse Control Activities & Lesson Plans (PreK-3rd Grade) | A 64-page PDF packet

Activities for Grieving Children | A 7-page PDF

Cope-Cake: Coping Skills Worksheets and Game | A 30-page packet for young children/students

Crossroads Counseling Center: Resources | Handouts on depression, anxiety, ADHD, etc. in children

Curriculum Materials from Pennsylvania Child Welfare Resource Center | Links to handouts

The Helpful Counselor: 10 Awesome Behavior Management Resources | Worksheets to use with children

Myle Marks: Free Downloads | Worksheets for children

Prevention Dimensions: Lesson Plans | Downloadable PDF handouts for children from kindergarten to sixth grade (Source: Utah Education Network)

Printable Worksheets | Worksheets for children on physical activity, substance abuse, nutrition, and more (Source: BJC School Outreach and Youth Development)

Social Emotional Activities Workbook | A 74-page PDF packet

Social Skills Worksheets | A packet of worksheets to use with children/youth

Stress Reduction Activities for Students | Link to a 20-page packet (PDF)

Adolescents & Young Adults

Change To Chill | Worksheets and handouts for reducing stress in teens and young adults

Emotional Intelligence Activities for Teens Ages 13-18 | A 34-page PDF packet

Handouts: Eppler-Wolff Counseling Center (Union College) | Handouts for college students

Healthy Living (Concordia University) | Handouts and articles for college students

Just for Teens: A Personal Plan for Managing Stress | A 7-page PDF handout

Oregon State University: Learning Corner | Student worksheets on time management, wellness, organization skills, etc.

The Relaxation Room (Andrews University) | Self-care and stress management handouts for college students

Resilience Toolkit from Winona State University | PDF handouts for college students on resiliency

Self-Help Resources from Metropolitan Community College Counseling Services | Links to articles for college students on a variety of topics (not in PDF form)

Self-Help (Western Carolina University) | Handouts for college students

Step UP! Program Worksheets and Handouts | Worksheets/handouts for students on prosocial behavior and bystander intervention

Teens Finding Hope: Worksheets and Information to Download | Spanish and English PDFs available

Tip Sheets from Meredith College Counseling Center | Student tip sheets on anger, body image, relationships, and other topics

Tools & Checklists from Campus Mind Works | Handouts and worksheets for students

UC Berkeley University Health Services Resources | Links to handouts, articles, and self-help tools for students

UMatter | Tools for college students on wellness, communication, healthy relationships, and more (Source: Princeton University)

Western Carolina University Counseling and Psychological Services: Self-Help | A modest collection of student wellness handouts along with a printable self-help workbook

Your Life Your Voice (from Boys Town): Tips and Tools | Links to articles and PDF printables on a variety of topics for teens and young adults

Marriage/Relationships & Family

21 Couples Therapy Worksheets, Techniques, & Activities | From Positive Psychology

Articles for Parenting from MomMD | Links to various articles/handouts (not in PDF form)

Drawing Effective Personal Boundaries | A 2-page PDF handout (Source: liveandworkonpurpose.com)

Emotionally Focused Therapy: Forms for Couples | A list of forms to use in EFT couples counseling

Exercises for Forgiveness | A 7-page PDF for recovering from an emotional affair

Healthy Boundaries by Larry L. Winckles | A 3-page PDF handout

Healthy Boundaries Program | A 15-page PDF packet (Source: The University of Toledo Police Department)

Healthy Boundaries vs. Unhealthy Boundaries | A 6-page PDF handout (Source: kimsaeed.com)

Hope Couple: Counseling Resources | Assessments and worksheets from a Christian counseling site

Joy2MeU | A collection of articles by Robert Burney on relationships, codependency, and related topics (not in PDF form)

New Beginnings Family Counseling: Handouts | Click on “Resources” to view and download handouts on relationships, anxiety, and depression. You can also download relationship assessment tools

Pasadena Marriage Counseling: Free Marriage Counseling Resources | A small collection of worksheets for couples therapy

Relationship Counseling Forms | PDF forms for couples therapy (Source: Dan Metevier, Psy.D., Clinical Psychologist)

Signs of Unhealthy Boundaries | A 6-page PDF handout (Source: Healing Private Wounds)

Additional Worksheets & Handouts

8 Helpful “Letting Go of Resentment” Worksheets | Links to PDF worksheets

90-Day Health Challenge | Several health worksheets for download (Source: HealthyCampbell)

Acorns to Oaktrees: Eating Disorder Worksheets/Eating Disorder Forms | A small collection of handouts for eating disorders

Activity eBooks from Rec Therapy Today | A collection of downloadable workbooks on self-esteem, social skills, emotions, etc.

Alzheimer’s Association: Downloadable Resources | Handouts on Alzheimer’s

Attitudes and Behaviour | A 9-page PDF packet on criminal thinking

Commonly Prescribed Psychotropic Medications | A-page PDF (Source: NAMI Minnesota)

Conflict Resolution Skills | A 6-page PDF packet

Coping Skills | A 2-page PDF worksheet (Source: Temple University)

EDA Step Worksheets | From Eating Disorders Anonymous

Experiential Group Exercises for Shame-Resilience | A 4-page PDF packet with questions for discussion and group activities

Free Mindfulness Worksheets (Mindfulness Exercises) | A large collection of mindfulness handouts

Go Your Own Way | Downloads for veterans on various topics

Guilt vs. Shame Infographic: National Institute for the Clinical Application of Behavioral Medicine | Printable infographic to illustrate the differences

Handouts and Worksheets | A 21-page PDF packet with handouts and worksheets on selfe-care topics

Homework and Handouts for Clients: ACT With Compassion | Handouts and worksheets related to self-compassion

Integrated Health and Mental Health Care Tools | Downloadable resources from UIC Center

International OCD Foundation: Assessments & Worksheets | Handouts for use with individuals with OCD

Learning to Forgive: The 5 Steps to Forgiveness | A 6-page PDF handout from Thriveworks

Managing Emotional Intelligence | A 7-page PDF packet (Source: inclusiv.org)

Motivation To Change | A 16-page PDF packet on motivation to change criminal behavior

Peers & Relationships | A 12-page PDF packet on how associates impact criminal behavior

Personal Development: Workplace Strategies for Mental Health | Handouts on resilience, communication, etc.

Prochaska and DiClemente’s Stages of Change Model | A 4-page PDF handout

Quick Reference to Psychotropic Medication | Downloadable PDF chart from John Preston, Psy.D.

Radical Forgiveness: Free Tools | A small collection of worksheets on forgiveness

Reducing Self-Harm | A 5-page PDF

Self-Care and Wellness Resources | Printable handouts and tools (Source: irenegreene.com)

Self-Care Starter Kit from University at Buffalo School of Social Work | Handouts on self-care topics

Self-Directed Recovery | Downloadable resources from UIC Center

Shame Psychoeducation Handout | A 5-page PDF handout

Stages of Change: Primary Tasks | A 2-page PDF handout

Therapy Worksheets: ADHD ReWired | Thought records, behavior charts, and other tools

Understanding and Coping with Guilt and Shame | A 4-page PDF handout

Wellness Toolkits | Printable toolkits from NIH


Please contact me if a link is no longer valid or if you’d like to recommend a site!

List Of Hobbies

Discover your next greatest hobby with this diverse list of assorted leisure activities, which range from beekeeping to Kombucha brewing to knife throwing to ghost hunting.

Compiled by Cassie Jewell, M.Ed., LPC, LSATP

I developed this list (with the help of Wikipedia, and Google, of course) as part of a project I was working on and thought it would be worth sharing. (Click below for a PDF version of this list.)

Hobby Categories

Animals & Nature | Arts & Crafts | Collections | Cooking & Baking | Entertainment | Home Improvement & DIY | Literature, Music, & Dance | Outdoor & Adventure | Self-Improvement & Social | Sports | Travel | Miscellaneous

Read and be inspired!

Animals & Nature

  • Attend pet shows (or horse shows)
  • Beekeeping
  • Berry or apple picking
  • Bird watching
  • Butterfly garden (Visit one or create your own!)
  • Butterfly watching
  • Be a plant parent; nurture and care for indoor plants
  • Composting
  • Dog training
  • Dog walking
  • Fossil hunting
  • Grow and tend to a fruit tree
  • Grow an indoor herb garden
  • Grow plants from seedlings (and plant outside when in-season)
  • Hang humming bird feeders and then sit back and enjoy the company!
  • Horseback riding
  • Become an expert at identifying various plants
  • Mushroom hunting
  • Nature walks
  • Adopt a pet
  • Pet fostering
  • Pet sitting
  • Plant a flower bed
  • Go on a swamp tour
  • Tend to a vegetable garden
  • Topiary
  • Visit a farm
  • Visit an aquarium
  • Go to zoos and/or nature centers
  • Watch wildlife on Animal Planet
  • Go whale watching

Arts & Crafts

  • Drawing
  • Candle making
  • Collages – Use whatever materials you desire!
  • Coloring
  • Crocheting
  • Design your own greeting cards or stationary
  • Flower arranging
  • Glassblowing
  • Jewelry making
  • Knitting
  • Lettering/calligraphy
  • Mixed media art
  • Mosaic making
  • Origami
  • Painting (watercolor, oils, acrylics, etc.)
  • Paper crafts (including paper mache)
  • Photography
  • Pressed flower craft
  • Pottery
  • Quilting
  • Scrapbooking
  • Sculpting
  • Sewing
  • Sketching
  • Soap making
  • Weaving
  • Wood carving

Collections

  • Action figures
  • Antiques
  • Autographs
  • Barbies
  • Books (classics, signed copies, etc.)
  • Christmas tree ornaments
  • Comics
  • Fun socks
  • Hot sauce from around the world
  • Movie or music memorabilia
  • Obsolete tech (i.e. outdated cell phones, tape players, etc.)
  • Original artwork
  • Plates
  • Purses, shoes, and other accessories
  • Recipes
  • Records
  • Retro video games
  • Rocks and/or crystals
  • Shells
  • Souvenirs
  • Sports memorabilia
  • Stickers
  • Ticket stubs
  • Toys
  • Vases
  • Vintage items

Cooking & Baking

  • Braising
  • Bread making
  • Cake decorating
  • Canning
  • Cheese making
  • Coffee roasting
  • Cookie decorating
  • Grilling and BBQ
  • Hosting dinner parties
  • Kombucha brewing
  • Learn ethnic and regional recipes
  • Learn recipes from cooking shows
  • Make “fun foods” for kids
  • Make homemade ice cream
  • Make jam or jelly
  • Make your own beef (or vegan!) jerky
  • Participate in competitive food festivals (or just go and enjoy the food!)
  • Pasta making
  • Pastry and confection making
  • Pickling
  • Pie making
  • Raw diet meals
  • Recreate menu items from your favorite restaurants
  • Reduced fat cooking
  • Sautéing
  • Slow cooker meals
  • Smoothie making
  • Soup, sauce, and stock making
  • Sushi making
  • Take a cooking class
  • Tea brewing
  • Try new recipes on a regular basis
  • Use an air fryer
  • Use a dehydrator
  • Use Pinterest for inspiration
  • Vegan cooking
  • Watch Food Network for inspiration

Entertainment

  • Attend movies, operas, plays, and musicals
  • Bingo
  • Board games and/or party games
  • Card games
  • Chess
  • Strategy games
  • Dine out at new restaurants
  • Escape rooms
  • Gaming
  • Go to museums
  • Go to poetry slams or open mic nights
  • Jigsaw puzzles
  • Karaoke
  • Murder mystery shows
  • Read entertainment/celebrity magazines
  • See your favorite bands/artists perform live
  • Standup comedy
  • Theme parks
  • Watch your favorite Netflix series, but make sure you become overly invested (borderline obsessed) with the story line and characters in order for this to qualify as a legit hobby

Home Improvement & DIY

  • Add a backsplash to your kitchen
  • Bathroom remodel
  • Build a shed
  • Build furniture
  • Design a meditation room, home office, “man cave,” or “she shed”
  • DIY headboard
  • Fireplace makeover
  • Hanging shelves
  • Home organization
  • Install smart home technology
  • Kitchen remodel
  • Paint an accent wall or update your entire home
  • Paint old cabinets
  • Redecorate a room
  • Stencil or wallpaper
  • Update a closet
  • Update furniture
  • Update lighting
  • Use chalk paint or metallic spray paint

Literature, Music, & Dance

  • Acting
  • Attend art galleries
  • Attend literary fests
  • Ballroom dancing
  • Belly dancing
  • Blogging/guest blogging
  • Break dancing
  • Editing
  • Go to book signings
  • Go to the library
  • Join a book club (either in-person or online, i.e. Goodreads)
  • Listen to music
  • Play/learn an instrument
  • Puppeteering
  • Rapping
  • Reading
  • Sell your art on etsy.com
  • Singing
  • Song-writing
  • Submit articles/opinion pieces/essays to magazines and newspapers
  • Swing dancing
  • Take a dance class (swing, hip hop, ballroom, etc.)
  • Take a drama or improv class
  • Take voice lessons
  • Wikipedia editing
  • Write a book
  • Write poetry
  • Write short stories

Outdoor & Adventure

  • Backpacking
  • Boating
  • Bungee jumping
  • Camping
  • Canoeing
  • Caving
  • Fishing
  • Geocaching
  • Go-Karting
  • Hiking
  • Hot air ballooning
  • Kayaking
  • Laser tag
  • Mountain biking
  • Mountain climbing
  • Paintball
  • Parasailing
  • Rocking climbing
  • Sailing
  • Scuba diving
  • Skiing
  • Skydiving
  • Snowboarding
  • Snorkeling
  • Waterskiing
  • White water rafting
  • Wilderness survival

Self-Improvement & Social

  • Advocate
  • Attend support groups/meetings
  • Attend workshops
  • Bullet journaling
  • Daily positive affirmations and/or self-reflection
  • Join a club
  • Join a gym
  • Join a Meetup group
  • Join a political campaign
  • Journaling
  • Keep a gratitude journal
  • Listen to podcasts
  • Make a vision board and update it regularly
  • Meditation
  • Read research
  • Read self-improvement books
  • Social media
  • Stretching
  • Take a class (i.e. self-defense, a foreign language, etc.)
  • Use a habit tracker app
  • Volunteer
  • Watch documentaries
  • Watch inspirational Ted Talks
  • Wear a fitness tracker
  • Yoga

Sports

  • Archery
  • Badminton 
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Biking
  • Body building
  • Bowling
  • Boxing
  • Cricket
  • Darts
  • Disc golf/frisbee
  • Fencing
  • Football/flag football
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Hockey
  • Ice skating
  • Jogging/running
  • Knife throwing
  • Lacrosse
  • Martial arts
  • Poker
  • Racquetball
  • Racing
  • Riding a unicycle
  • Roller derby
  • Rugby
  • Skateboarding
  • Soccer
  • Surfing/body boarding
  • Swimming
  • Table football
  • Table tennis
  • Tennis
  • Thai Chi
  • Volleyball
  • Weight training
  • Wrestling

Travel

  • Alaskan cruise
  • All-inclusive resorts
  • Beach vacations
  • Caribbean cruise
  • Cross country train trip
  • Explore your home town and other nearby place as though you’re a tourist
  • Guided group tours
  • Mediterranean cruise
  • Road trip
  • See the Northern Lights
  • Travel to all the continents in the world
  • Travel to all the states in America
  • Trip to Las Vegas
  • Visit the Grand Canyon
  • Visit the New Seven Wonders of the World
  • Visit the Seven Ancient Wonders of the World
  • Go on city walking tours

Miscellaneous Hobbies

  • Astrology/astronomy
  • Billiards
  • Couponing
  • Creating DIY home products
  • Fantasy sports
  • Genealogy
  • Ghost hunting
  • Hair styling/braiding
  • Hula hooping
  • Juggling
  • Keeping up with the latest fashions
  • Kite flying
  • Learning magic tricks
  • Makeup application
  • Metal detecting
  • Model building
  • People watching
  • Storage unit auctions
  • Sunbathing
  • Yard sale shopping/thrifting

Note: The Wikipedia webpage, “List of Hobbies” (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_hobbies), was utilized as a reference for this list.

Guest Post: The Toll Diabetes Takes on My Mental Health

Diabetes can take a toll on anyone. Michele Renee was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at the age of 22. In this post, she describes her experience with the disease, including how it affected her mental health. She also shares the key to finding peace with her illness.

By Michele Renee from Life With Michele Renee

Diabetes can take a toll on anyone, if not taken care of properly. When it comes to mental health though, diabetes is known to affect certain aspects of day to day life.

I first found out I had diabetes type 2 when I was 22 years old. I was overly stressed and eating my feelings way more than I should have. The stress and unhealthy lifestyle were what triggered my diabetes symptoms.

I have always dealt with depression and low self-esteem, but once my symptoms were triggered, I started to deal with memory loss, and a foggy brain. The best way to describe that experience is like you learn something that doesn’t quite make sense, but you could see where the concept is headed but you still can’t figure it out.

Then five minutes later you completely forget the meaning of the concept and where it was headed. I dealt with this constantly. I was in college during this time, and I ended up failing quite a bit of classes because I just couldn’t understand what I was learning. Also, on a test day, I would forget almost everything that I had studied.

How I Manage Diabetes Day to Day

I started having to keep an ongoing list of “To Do’s” and would have to revisit the list four or five times before I remembered to finish the “To Do” item.

This crossed over into my conversations with my friends and loved ones as well. Some days I wouldn’t remember what I said in a conversation from the day before. The short-term memory loss was horrible!

But once I started eating according to a diabetes diet, the fogginess and memory loss started to go away.

I also dealt with insomnia and poor sleep, and in a lot of ways that was a result of the foods I was eating. Once I changed my diet, and started exercising more, I slept a lot better.

Diabetes and Other Mental Health Issues

On top of diabetes, I also have a few other mental illnesses. One of them being bipolar disorder, rapid cycling. My highs would go for a week, then I would feel normal, then I would be low for another week, in terms of mood.

During my highs, I would often forget to eat, and that would leave me feeling shaky (a result of low blood sugar) and anxious. Some days, I would forget to eat for hours because I wanted to finish whatever inspiring project I was working on at the minute.

On my low mood swings, I would feel so depressed and sad, and sometimes even numb that I would binge eat. The binge eating would either be fast food or sugary foods (both of which I HAVE to avoid). This would cause me to feel nauseous and I would often get horrible migraines (a result of high blood sugar).

Insecurities From Diabetes

Dealing with both diabetes and my other mental health issues caused me to gain a ton of weight in the last fours years. I have gone through times where I lost the weight, then gained it back six months later.

It left me feeling very insecure, and like I had a bigger body than I actually do. I stopped taking photos of myself, and was mortified everytime I took a group photo with my friends. I found myself disgusted by my looks.

This led me to judge myself harshly when I deviated from my diet, and honestly probably pushed me to deviate more and more. The bad food was my comfort from my harsh criticism. It became a vicious cycle.

Healthy Living

Now, I try not to judge myself as harshly anymore. After beating myself up for so many years, I came to realize that I can find peace in this illness. I have managed it with diet alone and that is honestly a huge feat.

Most people who are diagnosed have to take either insulin shots or an insulin pill. I have pushed myself to find a healthy lifestyle that works for me. Once I did that, I started practicing accepting my flaws.

That is the hardest part of learning to love yourself, in my opinion. I also gathered a really strong support system that I go to almost every day when I am feeling super low or when I am feeling extremely insecure.

I also remind myself that no one is perfect, and we are all a work in progress. I have started putting little affirmations anywhere I can; I even made wallpaper affirmations for my phone!

Mental health is hard to handle when you are diabetic, but if you learn to love yourself, the process of managing it gets easier.

Read more of Michele’s inspiring posts at Life With Michele Renee, a lifestyle and wellness blog!

The Psychology of Motivation

What is the psychology behind motivation? This post examines the research on motivation and reviews the implications. The conclusion reached is contrary to what you may believe.

By Cassie Jewell, M.Ed., LPC

What is motivation? According to Merriam-Webster, to motivate is “to provide with a motive.” A motive is defined as “something (such as a need or desire) that causes a person to act.”

Motivation is highly sought after in today’s society; it’s the golden ticket to success. You would think achievement (as an end result) is motive enough, but this proves to be false. We desire success, but we’re unable to maintain our motivation. It dries up or fades away before the goal is reached. For example, a dieter is initially motivated by weight loss, improved sleep, and increased energy; these are all powerful motivators. But it’s not enough. Why?

If you look to Google, you’ll find countless sites claiming motivation “secrets” or hacks. How to Motivate Yourself in 10 Easy Steps. 7 Easy Ways to Motivate Yourself at Work. 5 Surprising Tips to Increase Your Motivation Immediately. Don’t be fooled. The shortcuts are appealing, but they’re not backed by research. Motivation is complex.

To learn what it is that drives us (and why that driving force is often short-lived), I reviewed the existing literature on motivation. (Hint: There are no secrets, tricks, or hacks.) As you read the following points, consider your goals and the role motivation plays.

1. Motivation can be intrinsic (arise from within) or extrinsic (influenced by outside forces).

Intrinsic motivation is rewarded internally. An example of intrinsic motivation would be pursuing the study of archeology because it holds a strong appeal or attraction. The behavior of engaging is the reward. Research establishes a strong link between interest and intrinsic motivation. Alternatively, extrinsic motivation refers to externally rewarded motives, such as writing a paper for a grade or performing well at work for a raise.

Practical application: If you’re looking for the motivation to achieve a goal, but lack the drive, add an incentive. Be creative. Choose rewards that are meaningful.

2. The presence of dopamine is related to motivation.

Studies have found that dopamine, a neurotransmitter, plays a considerable role in motivation. More recently, researchers have speculated there are specific areas in the brain responsible for motivation.

To consider: A lack of motivation could indicate chemical imbalance, especially if paired with feelings of sadness or hopelessness, fatigue, or thoughts of suicide. If your lack of motivation is debilitating, you may be depressed. Seek professional help.

3. Self-efficacy and perceived competence are positively related to motivation.

Research indicates that if you believe you can accomplish something, you’re more likely to achieve it than if you doubt yourself. This is a reoccurring theme in motivation literature. Self-efficacy is key.

Practical application: Evaluate your confidence. Do you view yourself as capable? On a scale from 1-10, how confidant are you that you can achieve [insert your goal here]? You won’t maintain the motivation to lose weight if you believe you’ll always be heavy. Self-doubt is a motivation trap. To cultivate self-efficacy, focus on your past accomplishments and successes. Reframe negative thoughts. (Instead of This is impossible, try This is difficult, but manageable.) Increase your self-efficacy by setting – and achieving – one or two easy goals.

4. Having a sense of control leads to greater motivation.

If you believe that life “happens” to you or that you are powerless to circumstances, you have an external locus of control. (This is sometimes known as learned helplessness.) It’s difficult to sustain motivation with this view. We can’t control all the variables in life, but we can control our choices and reactions. We control who and what we allow to negatively impact us. This knowledge is empowering. It allows for motivation and can foster an increased sense of efficacy.

Practical application: List or think about some undesirable aspects of your life (rent, a car accident, a difficult colleague, etc.) Select one item from your list and then write ways you can exercise control. (For example, you can’t control a difficult co-worker, but you control what you say to them, how you respond to them, and so on.) Recognize that your decisions directly impact the quality of your life.

5. Outcome value is related to motivation. 

The greater the perceived value of an outcome, the stronger the motivation. If you value living in a tidy home, you will be motivated to clean. For someone who doesn’t mind a mess, a clean house holds little value.

Practical application: You want to save money, but struggle to see the immediate benefits. Create a list of all the ways saving can improve your life, both now and in the future. Consider what’s currently important to you. If it’s spending time with family, link that to saving money. (Extra savings mean you can afford to dine out or take vacations with your family.) By increasing outcome value, you may increase your level of motivation. Apply this principle to all aspects of your life.

6. Goals and deadlines are motivating.

Define your outcome with a measurable goal and place a time limit on it. By defining exactly what you want (I want to lose 10 lbs.) and then giving yourself a deadline (in 3 months), you’re creating a blueprint. Having a goal map makes it easier to stay motivated by providing direction.

Practical application: When you need motivation, first consider the steps required to accomplish your goal. Be as specific as possible. And then create a deadline. (Note: Deadlines can be flexible. If you don’t meet your deadline, it’s easy to give up, leaving you the opposite of confident and effective. Instead, if a deadline isn’t met, push it back a week. Be reasonable. Revise your goal if needed. Remember to be solution-focused.)

7. Money is a motivator.

Researchers discovered that cash is a driving force. Money is a classic example of an extrinsic motivator – and it’s effective. So how can you use this information?

Practical application: There are apps and programs that pay you to stay on track. An example is the Achievement app; you earn points for exercising, drinking water, sleeping, and doing other health-related activities. Once you earn 10,000, you receive $10. Additionally, the weight loss program HealthyWage pays you to lose weight. (Be careful – there’s also a chance you’ll lose money!) If you dread going to work, think about your paycheck. Lastly, to motivate employees, offer small bonuses or other cash incentives linked to performance.

8. Working together on a task enhances motivation. 

Working toward a common goal with a partner or a group seems to enhance motivation.

Practical application: This practice can be applied in the workplace or at school. Don’t work on projects alone; find someone who shares your enthusiasm. If you want to start an exercise routine, ask a friend (who also wants to get in shape) to hit the gym with you. It seems we’re able to inspire and motivate each other; when one person’s motivation wanes, the other’s kicks in.

9. The source of motivation changes as we pursue our goals.

There’s something called “promotion” motivation. We’re good at setting goals and feeling motivated. Initially. Then, somewhere along the way, our motivation switches. It becomes “prevention” motivation. For example, the promotion motivation for losing weight may be fitting into a certain pair of jeans. When the jeans fit, the motivation becomes prevention motivation. Prevention motivation is harder to sustain.

To consider: Have a variety of motivational strategies. Recognize that motivation will change as you pursue your goals.

10. Once something becomes a habit, it persists long after motivation is gone.

This may be the most valuable finding of all. With motivation, there are variables: Self-efficacy, deadlines, money, etc. A habit supersedes the variables. There will be times we lack motivation, no matter how effective we feel or how much we value the outcome. If we act out of habit, we don’t have to rely on motivation. Of course, the tricky part is creating a new habit. Habits, which are formed by repetition, reorganize information in your brain so that an action becomes automatic and is no longer tied to a motivational cue.

To consider: Researchers assert it can take anywhere from 15 to 254 days to form a habit. In addition to repetition, you must remove cues that trigger habits you’re trying to quit while adding cues that trigger desired behaviors.

In conclusion, there are many factors related to motivation including self-efficacy, outcome value, and financial incentive. Our motivation changes as we pursue goals, indicating the need for a variety of motivational strategies. We know that dopamine plays an important role and that there are structural regions in the brain responsible for motivation.

A friend of mine recently asked how I motivate myself to go to the gym when I get off work. “It has nothing to do with motivation,” I responded. “I just do it; it’s not optional.”

I’m fully aware I lack motivation. However, I recognize that motivation, while advantageous, is not a prerequisite for success. It’s too fickle; it lacks the staying power of habit and the might of determination.

Don’t rely on motivation to achieve your goals. Instead, invest in the determination it takes to form a habit.


References 

Society for Personality and Social Psychology. (2014, August 8). How we form habits, change existing ones. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 8, 2018 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140808111931.htm

Bandura, A., & Schunk, D. H. (1981). Cultivating competence, self-efficacy, and intrinsic interest through proximal self-motivation. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 41(3), 586-598.

Bullard, O., & Manchanda, R. (2017). How goal progress influences regulatory focus in goal pursuit. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 27, 302–317.

Carr, P., & Walton, M. (2014). Cues of working together fuel intrinsic motivation. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 53, 169-184.

Gardner, B., Lally, P., & Wardle, J. (2012). Making health habitual: The psychology of “habit-formation” and general practice. The British Journal of General Practice, 62(605), 664–666.

Hsu, Y., Wang, S. D., Wang, S., Morton, G., Zariwala, H., de la Iglesia, H., & Turner, E. (2014). Role of the dorsal medial habenula in the regulation of voluntary activity, motor function, hedonic state, and primary reinforcement. The Journal of Neuroscience, 34(34), 11366 –11384.

Judge, T., & Ilies, R. (2002). Relationship of personality to performance motivation: A meta-analytic review. Journal of Applied Psychology, 87(4), 797–807.

Lai, E. (2011). Motivation: A literature review. https://images.pearsonassessments.com/images/tmrs/Motivation_Review_final.pdf

Landry, A., Gagné, M., Forest, J., Guerrero, S., Séguin , M., & Papachristopoulos, K. (2017). The relation between financial incentives, motivation, and performance: An integrative SDT-based investigation. Journal of Personnel Psychology, 16, 61-76.

Lunenburg, F. (2011). Goal-setting theory of motivation. International Journal Of Management, Business, and Administration, 15(1), 1-6.

Margolis, H., & McCabe, P. (2006). Improving self-efficacy and motivation: What to do, what to say. Intervention in School and Clinic, 41(4), 218-227.

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Pintrich, P. (2003). A motivational science perspective on the role of student motivation in learning and teaching contexts. Journal of Educational Psychology, 95, 667-686.

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Zimmerman, B., Bandura, A., & Martinez-Pons, M. (1992). Self-motivation for academic attainment: The role of self-efficacy beliefs and personal goal setting. American Educational Research Journal, 29(3), 663-676.