Guest Post: How to Stay in Shape During the Lockdown

Two simple workout programs for the home; no gym required!

By Kevin Mangelschots

Crazy things are happening all around the world at the moment. The pandemic, lockdowns, riots… In times like these, it’s crucial that you keep your mind sharp and healthy. But in many places, gyms have not reopened. And not everyone has the luxury of owning a home gym.

If you lack access to a gym (home or otherwise), fear not! You will be amazed at how fit you can get with little (or no) equipment if you put your mind to it! This article reviews ways you can workout at home (minus the weights and fitness machines).

Image by StockSnap from Pixabay

Beginner Workout Program 

Warmup: 

2-3 minutes of walking or riding the bike

Use this time to start your day off right. Go outside (weather permitting) and walk or ride your bike to warm up. If staying inside is your only option, walk in place or walk around your home.

Workout: 
  • > 30 seconds squats – 30 seconds rest
  • > 30 seconds planks – 30 seconds rest
  • > 30 seconds pushups – 30 seconds rest 
  • > 30 seconds lunges – 30 seconds rest 
  • > 30 seconds sit-ups – 30 seconds rest 
  • > 30 seconds Superman – 30 seconds rest 

–> Repeat this routine 2x. 

Cooldown:

2-3 minutes of walking or slow biking 

Intermediate Workout Program 

Warmup: 

2-3 minutes of walking or biking

Workout: 
  • > 20 burpees – 30 seconds rest 
  • > 30 close-grip pushups – 30 seconds rest 
  • > 20 Bulgarian lunges (10 left, 10 right) – 30 seconds rest 
  • > 30-second plank – 30 seconds rest 
  • > 40-second side plank (20 seconds left, 20 seconds right) – 30 seconds rest
  • > 30 seconds mountain climbers – 30 seconds rest 
  • > 30 seconds Superman – 30 seconds rest

–> Repeat this routine 2x.

Cooldown: 

2-3 minutes of walking or slow biking 

Adjusting Your Workout Program 

Both of the above workout programs can be easily modified to be less difficult or more challenging. Below, I will explain how you can experiment to adjust the difficulty of your workout program and ways you can experiment if you are getting bored. Sometimes, changing things up is necessary to maintain motivation.

Reduce or increase rest times. Reducing or increasing rest times will make the workout harder or easier. 
 
Increase or decrease the reps and sets. The amount of reps refers to how many times you repeat the same motion for one set. For example, bench pressing 100 kg (220.5 lbs) five times in a row counts as five reps. The amount of sets refers to how many times you repeat a number of reps. For example, bench pressing 100 kg (220.5 lbs) five times in a row counts as one set. You can do multiple sets of the same exercise after you take a short rest.
 
Increasing the amount of reps and sets makes the workout harder while decreasing makes it easier.  

Adjust the way you do certain exercises. Most exercises can be made harder or easier. For example, pushups can be done on hands and toes, the traditional way, but can also be performed on hands and knees. Alternatively, they can be done with your feet raised on a bench, making them harder.

Squats can be done with or without weights. If regular squats are too easy, you can perform single-leg squats to increase the difficulty of the exercise.

Image by Keifit from Pixabay

Add or decrease the number of exercises. You can also add or remove exercises from your routine to alter the level of difficulty. Exercises should be added as your level of training advances.

Consider adding the following exercises to a workout program:

The exercises listed above are just a few examples to add to your workout in order to make things trickier or for a nice change of pace if things get boring. Don’t hesitate to add your own exercises; get creative! Just be sure to perform any exercise with the correct form in order to prevent injuries.

Why Are These Workouts Effective?

The workout programs in this article are compound exercises. Compound exercises are exercises or movements that target multiple large muscle groups at the same time. (For example, squats are compound exercises that target the legs in addition to the back and abdominal muscles, among others.) With compound exercises, you get more “bang for your buck.” The core of any training program should always consist of compound exercises.

High-intensity interval training. This means your heartrate increases and stays elevated for prolonged periods of time. We accomplish this with exercises of a certain level of intensity and by keeping rest periods between the exercises relatively short.

Strength, endurance, and mobility combined into one workout. With these workouts you will become stronger because you use your own body weight as resistance and your endurance will increase because your heartrate goes up with this high-intensity interval training style. Your mobility will increase as well because you will be utilizing a full range of motion.

Easy, even for individuals lacking prior experience.

Easily adjustable workout routines. Multiple ways to adjust the templates to make your own workout more challenging or less difficult.  

Convenience and value. No equipment or gym memberships required; a cheap and easy path to fitness. Both exercise programs require little time and can be performed at home. No drive to the gym. What’s not to like?

Additional Home Workout Ideas

  • > Dumbbell workout
  • > Cardio kickboxing
  • > Jumping rope
  • > Home trainer
  • > Treadmill
  • > Walking up and down the stairs
  • > Resistance bands workout
  • > Kettlebell workout
Image by Rattakarn_ from Pixabay

Closing Thoughts 

In comparing the workouts, the biggest differences between the beginner and intermediate programs are the amount of exercises, the difficulty level, and the overall volume. Rest times are initially the same because everyone’s cardiovascular health is different, but should be adjusted for each individual.

Keep in mind that the workout programs are templates only; they provide general guidelines that can be adjusted for fitness and training level as well as individual differences. For example, one person may struggle with pushups while another has difficulty with squats. Prior experience and recent injury or illness should be taken into account. You can reduce or increase reps/sets or perform alternate versions of an exercise, such as performing pushups on hands and knees if the traditional pushup is too hard.

The common stigma that you need a lot of fancy equipment or heavy lifting to stay in shape is not necessarily true. While exercises that utilize body weight only may not lead to bulging muscles, they will lead to fitness and you being in great shape as you lose fat and gain strength.

Getting in a quality workout with the current lockdown regulations is challenging, but with some knowledge and determination it can certainly be done!


About the Author:

Kevin Mangelschots is a writer and occupational therapist with seven years of experience in the field of physical rehabilitation. He is a long-time fitness enthusiast. Kevin lives in Belgium and writes about general health with a specific focus on mental health and self-improvement on his blog, healthybodyathome.com

 

Must-Read Books for Therapists

A list of recommended reads, including workbooks and textbooks, for mental health professionals

Compiled by Cassie Jewell, M.Ed., LPC, LSATP

Recommended Reads for You & Your Clients

Workbooks

Textbooks

PracticePlanners Series

Additional Reading

Group Therapy Resource Guide

A resource guide for clinicians who facilitate counseling groups

By Cassie Jewell, M.Ed., LPC, LSATP

Throughout my counseling career, group therapy has been a focal part of what I do. I’ve worked mainly in residential settings where groups take place several times a day.

Initially, group counseling terrified me. (What if I can’t “control” the group? What if a member challenges me? What if I can’t think of anything to say? What if everyone gets up and leaves? – that actually happened, once – and on and on. What made group therapy especially intimidating was that if I “messed up,” an entire group of people [as opposed to one person] would witness my failure.)

I got over it, of course. Group facilitation wasn’t always comfortable and I made many (many!) mistakes, but I grew. I realized it’s okay to be both counselor and human; at times, humans say dumb stuff, hurt each other’s feelings, and don’t know the answer. By letting go of the need to be perfect, I became more effective. Group facilitation is now one of my favorite parts of the job.

This resource guide provides practical information and tools for group therapy for mental health practitioners.

Group Therapy Guidelines

Group therapy is an evidence-based treatment for substance use and mental disorders. An effective group calls for a skilled clinician to meet treatment standards. Professional associations, such as the American Group Psychotherapy Association, develop best practice guidelines based on scientific data and clinical research.


SAMHSA promotes research-based protocols and has published several group therapy guides for best practice, including TIP 41: Substance Abuse Treatment: Group Therapy, Substance Abuse Treatment: Group Therapy – Quick Guide for Clinicians, and Substance Abuse Treatment: Group Therapy Inservice Training (a training manual), in addition to group workbooks/facilitator guides for anger management, stimulant use disorder, and serious mental illness.

Book Recommendations

Group Exercises for Addiction Counseling (2012) by Dr. Geri Miller

The book itself is small in size but packed with helpful information and creative ideas. As a new counselor lacking in clinical skills, I supplemented with activities to engage the clients. Group Exercises for Addiction Counseling never failed me.

250 Brief, Creative & Practical Art Therapy Techniques: A Guide for Clinicians and Clients (2019) by Susan I. Buchalter

A more recent discovery of mine. This guide provides detailed instructions accompanied by thought-provoking discussion questions for each intervention. I was impressed with both the quality and originality; an instant upgrade to “house-tree-person.”

For clinical group practice

  • Corey, M. S., Corey, G., & Corey, C. (2018). Groups: Process and practice.
  • Yalom, I. D., & Leszcz, M. (2015). The theory and practice of group psychotherapy.

Icebreakers & Teambuilding

You need only Google “icebreakers” and you’ll have a million to choose from. I’m not listing many, but they’re ones clients seem to enjoy the most.


Activity 1: My most highly recommended icebreaker activity involves passing out blank slips of paper to each group member and instructing them to write a “fun fact” about themselves, something no one else in the group would know. I provide them with examples (i.e. “I once had a pet lamb named Bluebell” or “I won a hotdog eating contest when I was 11 and then threw up all over the judges’ shoes”). Depending on the crowd, you may want to tell clients not to write anything they wouldn’t want their peers to know. (I adopted this guideline after a client wrote about “sharting” himself.) Once everyone has written something, have them fold their papers and place in a container of some sort (a gift box, paper bag, plastic bowl, etc.) Group members take turns passing around the container (one-at-a-time) and picking a slip to read aloud. They must then guess who wrote it. (I give three guesses; after that, I turn it over to the group.)

Activity 2: A similar but more structured activity is to write out questions ahead of time and have clients take turns drawing and answering the questions. Questions can be silly, thought-provoking, or intending to illicit a strong emotional response (depending on the audience and goals for the group).

Activity 3: “People Search” involves a list of traits, feats, talents, or experiences. Each client receives the list and is given x amount of time to find someone in the group who is a match; that individual will then sign off. The first person to have their list completely signed sits down; they win. I typically let clients continue to collect signatures until two additional people sit down. (Prizes optional, but always appreciated.) During the debriefing, it’s fun to learn more (and thereby increase understanding and compassion).

Activity 4: “First Impressions” works best with group members who don’t know each other well. It’s important for group members to know each other’s names (or wear name tags). Each group member has a sheet of paper with various “impressions” (i.e. judgments/stereotypes). For example, items on the list might be “Looks like an addict” and “Looks intelligent.” Clients write other group members’ names for each impression. In addition to enhancing a sense of community, this activity provides an avenue for discussing harmful stereotypes and stigma.

Activity 5: Affirmations groups can be powerful, generating unity and kindness. The effect seems to be more pronounced in gender-specific groups. There are a variety of ways to facilitate an affirmations group, ranging from each person providing an affirmation to the client on their right to individuals sharing a self-affirmation with the group to creating a self-affirmation painting. Another idea is to give each client a sheet of paper. (Consider using quality, brightly-colored paper/posterboard and providing markers, gel pens, etc.) Clients write their name on it and then all the papers are passed around so each group member has the opportunity to write on everyone else’s sheet. Once their original paper is returned to them, they can read and share with the group. This can lead to a powerful discussion about image, reputation, feeling fake, etc. (Plus, clients get to keep the papers!)

Activity 6: “Most Likely to Relapse/Least Likely to Relapse” works best with a well-formed group and may require extra staff support. It’s good for larger groups and can be highly effective in a therapeutic community. Clients receive blank pieces of paper and are tasked to write the names of who they think is most likely and least likely to relapse. After writing their own name on the sheet, they turn it in to staff (effectively allowing staff to maintain a safe and productive environment). Staff then read each sheet aloud (without naming who wrote it). If they choose, clients can share what they wrote and provide additional feedback. (Most do.) Clients selected as “most likely” (in either category) have the opportunity to process with other group members and staff.


Access group therapy worksheets and handouts here.

Links to Additional Group Activities

Psychoeducation & Process Groups

In need of fresh material? It can be easy to fall into a rut, especially if you’re burnout or working with a particularly challenging group. The following three PDF downloads are lists of ideas for group topics. I also included two links to sites with helpful suggestions.


As a group facilitator, consider incorporating some sort of experiential activity, quiz, handout, game, etc. into every session. For example, start with a check-in, review a handout, facilitate a discussion, take a 5-minute bathroom break, facilitate a role-play, and then close the group by summarizing and providing clients with the opportunity to share what they learned. If that’s not feasible, provide coffee or snacks; sitting for 45 minutes is difficult for some, and 90 minutes can be unbearable.

Another idea is to have a “fun” or “free” group in the curriculum. Ideas include going bowling, having a potluck, Starbucks run, game group (i.e. Catchphrase, Pictionary, etc.), escape room, nature walk, etc.


Dealing With Challenges

Clients are not always willing therapy participants; some are court-ordered to attend or there to have privileges restored. Some attendees may be there “voluntarily,” but only to save their marriage or keep a job, not believing they need help. In residential treatment, clients attend mandatory groups as part of the daily schedule — participate or you’re out.

Even when attendance is truly voluntary, a group member may be in a bad space. Maybe they’re stressed about the rent or just got into a fight with their significant other. Or what if the AC is broken and the group room is 80 degrees? What if a client has unpleasant body odor or bad breath or an annoying cough?

Multiple factors combine and it’s suddenly a sh**show. (I’ll never forget the client who climbed onto a chair to “rally the troops” against my tyranny.) Anticipating challenges is the first step to effectively preventing and managing them.


Click here for an excellent article from Counseling Today that addresses the concept of client resistance.

Tips for dealing with challenges

  1. If possible, co-facilitate. One clinician leads while the other observes. The observer remains attuned to the general “tone” of the group, i.e. facial expressions, body language, etc.
  2. Review the expectations at the beginning of every group. Ask clients to share the guidelines with each other (instead of you telling them). This promotes a collaborative spirit.
  3. After guidelines are reviewed, explain that while interrupting is discouraged, there may be times when you interject to maintain overall wellness and safety. (Knowing this, a client is less likely to get angry or feel disrespected when/if it happens.)
  4. If you must interrupt, apologize, and explain the rationale.
  5. Avoid power struggles at all costs, especially when a client challenges the benefits of treatment. (The unhealthier group members will quickly side with a challenger, leading to a complaint session.) Challenging the efficacy of treatment (or you as a clinician) is often a defense mechanism. Sometimes, the best response is simply “okay,” or none at all… and keep moving. You can also acknowledge the client’s perspective and ask to meet with them after group (and then get back on topic). If the group is relatively healthy, you may want to illicit feedback from other group members.
  6. If a client becomes angry or tearful, give them time to vent for a moment or two (don’t “Band-Aid”); they may be able to self-regulate. (If they do self-regulate, share your observations and offer praise.)
  7. If a client’s anger escalates to a disruptive level, ask them to take a break. At this point, their behavior is potentially triggering to other group members. Don’t raise your voice or ask them to calm down. Direct them step out and return when they’re ready. You may have to repeat yourself several times, but remain firm and calm, and they will eventually listen.
  8. If a client is disrespectful (cursing at you or another client, name-calling, insulting, etc.) while escalated, let them know it’s not okay, but don’t attempt to provide feedback. (A simple, “Hey, that’s not okay,” will suffice.) Bring it up with the client later when they’re able to process.
  9. Once the client who has been disrespectful leaves the room, acknowledge what happened and let the group know you will follow up with the client. If another client wants to talk about it, ask them to share only how it made them feel, but stress that it’s not okay to talk about an absent group member. (“How would you feel if we talked about you when you weren’t here?”) Strongly suggest that they wait until the person returns (and is open) to have a group discussion.
  10. After a major blow-up (and once everyone is calm), it can be beneficial for the group to process it with the person who escalated. Group members can empathize/relate, share their observations and/or how it made them feel, and offer feedback.
  11. If other disruptive behaviors occur in group (side conversations, snoring, etc.) address them in the moment (without shaming, of course). Point out the behavior and explain how it’s disruptive to the group. Refer back to the group guidelines. Ask group members to comment as well. If you let a behavior persist, hoping it will eventually stop, you’re sending the message that it’s okay, not only to the person who is disruptive, but to the entire group. This impacts the integrity of the group and opens things up for additional disruptive behaviors.
  12. For clients who monopolize, who are constantly joking, or who attempt to intentionally distract by changing the topic, point out your observations and encourage group members to give feedback.
  13. If, on the other hand, clients seem disengaged or unmotivated, seek out their feedback, privately or in the group, whichever is clinically appropriate.
  14. If there’s a general level of disengagement, bring it up in the group. Remain objective and state your observations.
  15. Anticipate that at times, people may not have much to say. (And while yes, there’s always something to talk about, that doesn’t mean someone is ready to or has the emotional energy to.) Maybe they’re distracted or tired or feeling “talked out.” It’s good to have backup plans: watch a psychoeducational film, take a walk in the park, listen to meditations or music, provide worksheets, education reading material, or coloring sheets.

Always keep in mind a client’s stage of change, their internal experiences (i.e. hearing voices, social anxiety, paranoia, physical pain, etc.), external circumstances (i.e. recent medication change, loss of housing, conflict with roommates, etc.), and history of trauma. What looks like resistance may be something else entirely.

Professional Group Therapy Associations

Academic Articles

Online Articles

Additional Links

Misleading Marketing Tactics: How Companies Use Psychology to Sway

Marketers use psychological tactics to influence, convince, and even deceive consumers. This article explores some of the lesser-know marketing traps and how you can avoid them.

By Cassie Jewell, M.Ed., LPC, LSATP

I’m sure it’s no surprise when you Google “bathing suits,” and shortly thereafter, swimwear ads litter your Facebook feed. Wikipedia defines marketing as “the business process of identifying, anticipating and satisfying customers’ needs and wants.”

There’s an entire branch of research dedicated to understanding consumer behavior via psychological, technological, and economical principles. However, you may be less aware of marketing tactics intended to foster false trust or play on subconscious fears.

Image by Aurore Duwez from Pixabay

Here’s a real life example: Recently, I used DoorDash to order breakfast from Silver Diner. I was shocked when the total came to nearly $70. Luckily, my husband was too; he suggested going directly through the restaurant. I selected the equivalent menu items and it was $30 cheaper!! DoorDash not only raised entrée prices, but charged additional fees on top of the delivery fee and tip. To think, I wouldn’t have compared prices had my husband not been (duly) outraged; I almost fell victim to “brand trust.”

Consider the companies you trust. Why don’t you question their products, services, prices, etc.? Are you brand-washed?

To avoid misleading marketing traps, always compare prices, read reviews from verified buyers, avoid grocery shopping when you’re hungry, steer clear of end-of-aisles deals, buy off-season, etc.

Image by mohamed Hassan from Pixabay

This article explores a few lesser-known ways marketers influence consumers by using psychological principles, and how to avoid them. When you, the consumer, know the science behind advertising strategies, you’re better equipped to make educated decisions (and will avoid feeling betrayed by a food delivery app!)


A false sense of health

Marketers use health-related buzzwords like “gluten-free” or “organic” to lure buyers with an impression of being nutritious. In one study, consumers viewed items stamped with healthy-sounding catchphrases as healthier than non-stamped foods.

Real life example: Years ago, I accompanied a friend to the grocery store. In the dairy section, she grabbed a jug of whole milk. I knew she wanted to lose weight, so I suggested skim. Dubious, she expressed concern because it wasn’t “vitamin D-rich.” Had she consulted the nutrition facts instead of scanning labels, she would know whole and skim have equal amounts of the vitamin.

Image by Aline Ponce from Pixabay

Avoid this trap by reading nutrition facts and ingredients before buying. (Sure, those Fruit Loops are made with whole grain, but the first ingredient is sugar!)

Beware of fast-paced music in a crowded store

Researchers found that consumers’ spending increased as the tempo of the music quickened. In addition to spending more, shoppers purchased additional items (instead of opting for fewer products at higher prices). Interestingly, this effect was only observable when the store was crowded.

Remain aware of your environment when shopping and if possible, go when crowds are thin (or at least wear ear buds).

An unconscious fear of dying may lead you to buy more bottled water – and water bottle companies capitalize on it!

(Um, what? I thought the occasional 7-Eleven purchase of Deer Park was a combination of laziness and convenience on my part, not an ominous and looming fear of my fragile mortality.)

In 2018, researchers asserted that “most bottled-water advertising campaigns target a deep psychological vulnerability in humans, compelling them to buy and consume particular products. Bottled water ads specifically trigger our most subconscious fear [of death].” It was also suggested that bottled water symbolizes something safe and pure – compelling when you want to avoid health risks.

Image by Franck Barske from Pixabay

According to the study, bottled water appeals most to people who measure their personal value by their physical appearance, fitness levels, material and financial wealth, class, and status.

Whether or not this study withstands replication, consider a filter!

Don’t shop for beach gear on a sunny day

Save your shopping for poorer weather conditions. Researchers found that consumers place a higher value on associated products respective to the weather.

The rationale: It’s easier for someone to visualize the comfort of a fluffy beach towel or the shade of an umbrella when it’s hot and bright (compared to when it’s pouring rain), thereby increasing the desire to make a purchase.  Interestingly, this seems to hold true for sunny or snowy conditions, but not rainy weather. It was speculated that rain gear is typically purchased to avoid unpleasant conditions, not to increase enjoyment.

Be wary of the weather when shopping for that beach trip or ski vacation in the mountains; you may end up spending more than intended.

Marketing’s seductive siren song

If you’re not one who’s influenced by the “logical persuasion” of advertisements, you may still be subconsciously enticed by the “non-rational influence.” Different kinds of advertisements evoke different types of brain activity.

Even the wisest consumer can be “seduced.” Marketers both overtly and subtly influence our buying behaviors. Your brain will unavoidably betray you at times; you can either accept this or become a hermit. (You may also consider shopping where there are lenient return policies, but be wary of policies that seem too lenient, as this may be a ploy.)

The relaxation effect – don’t get too comfortable!

A 2011 study indicated that relaxed consumers perceived items at a higher value when compared to their less-relaxed (although not stressed) counterparts.

Image by LEEROY Agency from Pixabay

If you’re a bargain-hunter, stay alert to how you’re feeling before entering a store or searching on Amazon; otherwise, you may think you’re getting a great deal when you’re not. (And if you use social media, know that ads may have more sway when you’re sleepy.)


In the midst of misleading marketing tactics and #fakenews, stick with the facts and practice emotional intelligence; don’t be swayed.

Do You Speak Therapist?

A list of common questions and phrases used in therapy – includes a free PDF printable version of this resource

By Cassie Jewell, M.Ed., LPC, LSATP

Therapists have their own unique (and purposeful) language. We may use jargon when talking to others in the field, but with our clients (and most likely, with other significant people in our lives), we are focused and thoughtful.

Therapy is a tool for self-discovery; as therapists, it’s important to know how to effectively employ this tool. (For example, a hammer, while a useful tool, would not be effective if someone used the handle to pound a nail instead of the head.) What we say and how we say it is powerful: open-ended questions, reflections, clarifications, etc.

The following is a list of questions/phrases I find myself using in individual therapy and group sessions to explore, empathize, empower, and motivate change, including a few versions of the “miracle question” (a question used in therapy that asks the client to imagine what their life would look like if, miraculously, all of their problems disappeared and everything was perfect).

Click below to access a printable PDF version of this list.


1. How are you feeling?

2. How does/did that make you feel?

3. What would happen if you gave yourself permission to feel your emotions?

4. What was that experience like for you?

5. When did you first notice that…

6. When did you first recognize that…

7. What are your current internal experiences and reactions?

8. I’m noticing that…

9. What I’m hearing is…

10. It sounds like…

11. I wonder if…

12. It makes a lot of sense hearing it from your perspective… and, I wonder what would happen if…

13. May I share some feedback with you?

14. Are you open to a suggestion?

15. Would you like to hear a different perspective?

16. May I share my observations?

17. Would you like to know more about [mental health topic]?

18. Some research indicates that __________, but other studies have found that __________.

19. Tell more about that.

20. Tell me what that was like for you.

21. Will you say more about that?

22. Can you speak to…

23. I’m not sure I understand.

24. Help me to understand.

25. Correct me if I’m wrong, but…

26. What am I missing? Something doesn’t quite match up…

27. Is there anything else I need to know?

28. Did I hear you correctly when you said…

29. May I pause you for a minute?

30. Can we return to what you said earlier about…

31. It looks like you shut down when I said __________. Can we talk about it?

32. You seem distracted today. Do you want to talk about something else?

33. Do you want to take a break from this topic?

34. What do you think __________ would say if they were here in this room with us?

35. If it was __________ in this situation, what advice would you give them?

36. What does __________ look like to you?

37. What does __________ mean to you?

38. What message did you hear when they said…

39. How would your life be different if you didn’t have…

40. Was there anything you could have done differently?

41. It sounds like you were doing the best you could with what you had at the time.

42. Honestly, I’m not sure how I would have reacted if in your shoes.

43. You’re the expert on you.

44. I wish I had the answer to that.

45. That’s a really good question. What do you think?

46. On the one hand __________, but on the other…

47. You say __________, but your actions…

48. I’m concerned that…

49. I can only imagine how __________ that was for you.

50. Can we explore this more?

Movies for Addiction & Mental Health

(Updated 5/20/20) A list of movies about mental health and substance abuse – includes PDF printable discussion questions

By Cassie Jewell, M.Ed., LPC, LSATP

The following is a list of films that are appropriate to show in treatment settings. This post includes movie summaries and downloadable PDF handouts with questions for discussion. Please note that some of the films on this list are graphic and may not be appropriate for children or adolescents.

Hint: The handouts contain spoilers; do not provide until after the movie ends.


Ben Is Back (2018)

103 minutes (1 hour, 43 minutes), R-rating for language and drug use

Summary: Julia Roberts plays a mother, Holly, whose 19-year old son, Ben, surprises her by returning home for Christmas. Ben is newly in recovery; his addiction has placed a tremendous strain on the family in the past. Ben’s younger siblings are happy to see him, but Holly, fearing that he is not ready, is apprehensive. That evening, the family attends church. When they return, they find their home burglarized and the dog missing. Ben blames himself, believing someone from his past took the dog to get his attention; he leaves to look for the dog. Holly goes with him, but they’re later separated, and Holly attempts to track Ben. Eventually, she ends up at an abandoned barn where she finds her son on the floor, unresponsive. The movie ends with her administering Narcan to Ben.

Girl, Interrupted (1999)

127 minutes (2 hours, 7 minutes), R-rating for strong language and content relating to drugs, sexuality, and suicide

Summary: Winona Ryder plays Susanna, a young woman with borderline personality disorder, who is sent to a psychiatric hospital after a suicide attempt in the late 1960s. She befriends Lisa (Angelia Jolie), who carries a diagnosis of sociopathy (antisocial personality disorder). Initially, Susanna is in denial about her mental condition and is not open to treatment. However, she reaches a turning point after a tragedy.

Pay It Forward (2000)

123 minutes (2 hours, 3 minutes), PG-13 rating for mature thematic elements including substance abuse/recovery, some sexual situations, language, and brief violence

Summary: Trevor (Haley Joel Osment) starts a chain reaction of goodness for a social studies project with a plan to change the world for the better. In this film, Trevor is a high school student whose mother, Arlene (Helen Hunt), struggles with alcoholism and whose father is abusive. He rises above unfortunate circumstances with the kindhearted idea to do a good deed, but instead of requesting payback, asking the receiver to “pay it forward” to at least three people – and on and on. While the movie has a bittersweet end, the message is uplifting and powerful.  

The Perks of Being a Wallflower (2012)

103 minutes (1 hour, 43 minutes), PG-13 rating

Summary: Charlie is an unpopular high school freshman, a “wallflower,” who is befriended by two seniors, Patrick and Sam (Emma Watson). The movie is about their friendship and Charlie’s personal struggles with the recent suicide of his friend and his own mental illness. Throughout the film, Charlie has flashbacks of his aunt, who died in a car accident when he was 7. It’s eventually revealed that Charlie’s aunt molested him; a sexual encounter with Sam triggers Charlie’s repressed memories. Charlie has a mental breakdown.

Rachel Getting Married (2008)

113 minutes (1 hour, 54 minutes), R-rating for language and brief sexuality

Summary: Anne Hathaway plays Kym, a troubled young woman, who returns from rehab to her family home for her sister’s wedding. The film portrays how Kym’s addiction has placed strain on the family.

When a Man Loves a Woman (1994)

126 minutes (2 hours, 6 minutes), R-rating for language

Summary: Meg Ryan plays Alice, a woman with an alcohol use disorder. The film is about how Alice’s addiction impacts her family and how she recovers.

Bonus: The Netflix original films Heroin(e) (2017) and Recovery Boys (2018) have PDF discussion guides with a summary, questions, and resources posted on the Recovery Boys website.


Other great resources for using clinical films as therapeutic interventions include the book Movies & Mental Illness: Using Films to Understand Psychopathy, 4th ed. (by Danny Wedding and Ryan M. Niemiec) and the site Teach With Movies.

Sites with Free Therapy Worksheets & Handouts

(Updated 5/4/20) A list of sites with free printable resources for mental health clinicians and consumers

By Cassie Jewell, M.Ed., LPC, LSATP

If you’re a counselor or therapist, you’re probably familiar with Therapist Aid, one of the most well-known sites providing free printable worksheets. PsychPoint and Get Self Help UK are also great resources for cost-free handouts, tools, etc. that can be used with clients or for self-help.

When I started blogging, I realized just how much the Internet has to offer when it comes to FREE! That being said, I’ve learned the term free is often misleading. There are gimmicky sites that require you to join an email list in order to receive a free e-book, PDF printables, etc.; I don’t consider that free since you’re making an exchange. I also dislike and generally avoid sites that bombard with ads. A third “free-resource” site that’s deceiving is the site with no gimmicks or ads, but turns out to be nothing more than a ploy to get you to buy something.

For this post, I avoided misleading sites and instead focused on government agencies, educational institutions, and nonprofits. I found some sites that offered a variety of broad-topic PDF resources and others that had fewer, but provided specialized tools. See below for links to over 50 sites with free therapy worksheets and handouts for both clinicians and consumers.

(Click here for free worksheets, handouts, and guides posted on this site.)

Please check back frequently; I update regularly.

Mental Health & Addiction (Sites with Worksheets/Handouts on a Variety of Topics)

91 Free Counseling Handouts | Handouts on self-esteem, emotions, recovery, stress, and more

A Change in Thinking: Self-Help Library | A large collection of worksheets and handouts on communication, relationships, depression, and more

A Good Way to Think: Resources | Worksheets and handouts on happiness, well-being, values, etc.

Articles by Dr. Paul David | Clinical handouts on depression, relationships, substance use disorders, family issues, etc.

ASI-MV Worksheets & Handouts | Addiction and recovery handouts

Belmont Wellness: Psychoeducational Handouts, Quizzes, and Group Activities | Printable handouts on assertiveness, emotional wellness, stress management, and more

Black Dog Institute: Clinical Resources | Download fact sheets, handouts, mood trackers, and more on a variety of mental health topics

Brene Brown: Downloads and Guides | Resources for work, parenting, the classroom, and daily life

Bryan Konik | Therapist & Social Worker: Free Therapy Worksheets | A collection of worksheets on stress management, anxiety, relationships, goal setting, and trauma

Cairn Center: Resources | A modest collection of printable assessments, handouts, and worksheets on DBT, anxiety, depression, etc.

Client Worksheets from Treatment for Stimulant Use Disorders (Treatment Improvement Protocols Services) | 44 client worksheets on addiction and recovery

Cornell Health: Fact Sheet Library | A variety of handouts and tracking sheet on various health topics; only a few relate to mental health and addiction

Daniel J. Fox, Ph.D.: Forms, Presentation Slides, and Worksheets | Topics include anger, emotions, borderline personality disorder, etc.

DOWNLOADS from Get Self Help | Free therapy worksheets and handouts on a variety of topics

Dr. Danny Gagnon, Ph.D., Montreal Psychologist: Self-Help Toolkits | Articles and handouts on worry, depression, assertiveness, etc.

EchoHawk Counseling: Materials and Resources | Articles, worksheets, and handouts on a variety of topics (boundaries, emotions, grief, stress, trauma, etc.)

Eddin’s Counseling Group: Worksheets | A short list of free worksheets and handouts

Faith Harper: Worksheets and Printables | A small collection of therapy worksheets and handouts, including a gratitude journal

Forward Ethos: Guide Sheets | Worksheets on mindfulness, anxiety, self-care, intimacy, relationships, and more

Free Stuff for Consumers and Professionals | A short list of downloads (Source: Jonathan S. Abramowitz, Ph.D.)

InFocus Resources | Family handouts on addiction

Lynn Martin | A short list of client handouts, including questionnaires

Mark R. Young, LMSW, LCSW (Resolving Concerns): Links & Forms | Links to factsheets, worksheets, assessments, etc.

Mental Health CE | Course content handouts on a variety of mental health topics

Motivational Interviewing Worksheets

My Group Guide: A Collection of Therapy Resources

Oxford Clinical Psychology: Forms and Worksheets | A large collection of therapy worksheets based on evidence-based practices

Peggy L. Ferguson, Ph.D.: Addiction Recovery Worksheets | A modest collection of handouts/worksheets for addiction and recovery

PsychPoint: Therapy Worksheets

Self-Help Exercises from Gambling Therapy

Self-Help Reading Materials | Links to handouts on self-help topics (Source: Truman State University)

Self-Help Tools from Mental Health America | Links to assessments, worksheets, handouts, and more

Sleep and Depression Laboratory: Resources | A small collection of worksheets related to sleep, worry, and depression

SMART Recovery Toolbox | Addiction and recovery resources

The Stages of Change | A 7-page PDF packet (Source: Virginia Tech Continuing and Professional Education)

Step Preparation Worksheets | (Source: treatmentguide4u.com)

Substance Abuse | A 13-page PDF packet

Taking The Escalator: Therapy Tools | Handouts on addiction and recovery

Therapist Aid | Free therapy worksheets

Therapy Worksheets | A therapy blog with links to free worksheets on various mental health topics

Tools for Coping Series | A large collection of handouts on coping skills

Worksheets from A Recovery Story (Blog) | A small collection of addiction and recovery worksheets

Depression, Stress, & Anxiety

Alphabet of Stress Management and Coping Skills | Coping skills for every letter of the alphabet

Anxiety 101 | An 11-page PDF packet (Source: Michigan Medicine | University of Michigan)

Anxiety Canada: Free Downloadable PDF Resources | Anxiety worksheets for parents and self-help

Behavioral Activation for Depression | A 35-page packet

Coping with Anxiety and Panic Attacks: Some Cognitive Behavioural Self-Help Strategies | A 10-page packet

Creating Your Personal Stress Management Plan | A 10-page packet

Dr. Chloe: Worksheets for Anxiety Management | A small collection of worksheets and handouts

Panic Attack Worksheets (Inner Health Studio) | A 9-page PDF packet

Relaxation | A 15-page packet on relaxation skills for anxiety

Stress Management (Inner Health Studio) | A 5-page packet on stress management

UMASS Medical School Department of Psychiatry: Stress Management – Patient Handouts | A collection of handouts on stress management. Some of the other sections, including “General Health and Wellness” and “Nutrition” have links to handouts as well

Trauma & Related Disorders

Center for Sexual Assault & Traumatic Stress: Therapist Resources | More than just worksheets: client handouts, assessments, info sheets, toolkits, training resources, links, etc.

Child and Family Studies: Sex in the Family | An 8-page packet on shame and guilt in relation to child sexual abuse

Common Reactions to Trauma | A 1-page PDF handout

Detaching From Emotional Pain (Grounding) | A 12-page PDF packet (Source: Sunspire Health)

Grounding Exercises | A 2-page PDF handout

Grounding Techniques | A 1-page PDF handout from JMU Counseling Center

Grounding Techniques | A 2-page PDF handout

Healing Private Wounds Booklets | Religious handouts on healing from sexual abuse

Seeking Safety Resources | Printable worksheets on PTSD, substance abuse, and healthy relationships

Selected Handouts and Worksheets from: Mueser, K. T., Rosenberg, S. D., & Rosenberg, H. J. (2009). Treatment of Postraumatic Stress Disorder in Special Populations: A Cognitive Restructuring Program | A 13-page PDF packet

Trauma Research and Treatment: Trauma Toolkit A small collection of trauma handouts

Traumatic Stress: The Effects of Overwhelming Experience on the Mind and Body | A 12-page PDF packet (Source: Dan Metevier, Psy.D., Clinical Psychologist)

Wisconsin Hawthorn Project: Handouts & Worksheets | Handouts in English and Spanish

Psychosis

CBT for Psychosis & Trauma Handouts

Early Psychosis Intervention: Client Worksheets | Scroll down to the “Client Worksheets” section for links. Use with clients who are experiencing psychosis

Goal-Setting Worksheet for Patients with Schizophrenia | A 3-page PDF

List of 60 Coping Strategies for Hallucinations | A 2-page PDF

Treatment for Schizophrenia Worksheet Pack | A 6-page PDF packet

ACT, CBT, & DBT

ACT Mindfully: Worksheets, Book Chapters & ACT Made Simple | ACT worksheets and other free resources

Cognitive Therapy Skills | A 33-page packet

Carolina Integrative Psychotherapy | A small collection of DBT worksheets and handouts

Clinician Worksheets and Handouts: Clinician Treatment Tools | A variety of CBT, DBT, etc. therapy worksheets

CPT Web Resources | A short list of worksheets and handouts

DBT Peer Connections: DBT Handouts and Worksheets | DBT resources

DBT Self-Help | Printable lessons and diary cards

Dr. John Forsyth: Free Resources | Download two free packets of worksheets (ACT and mindfulness)

Living CBT: Free Self-Help | 20+ CBT worksheets

Lozier & Associates: Dialectical Behavior Therapy Printables – DBT Worksheets and DBT Handouts | A small collection of DBT handouts and worksheets

Printable Versions of CPT/CBT Worksheets | English and Spanish worksheets (Source: The F.A.S.T. Lab at Stanford Medicine)

Veronica Walsh’s CBT Blog: Free Downloadable Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Worksheets/Handouts | Print/use these worksheets only with blog author’s permission

Grief & Loss

Activities for Grieving Children | A 7-page PDF

Bereavement Handouts (Hospice & Palliative Care) | A small collection of handouts

The Center for Complicated Grief: Handouts | Assessments, handouts, and guides

A Child’s Understanding of Death | An 11-page packet

Handouts to Download and Print: One Legacy | Handouts on grief and loss

Loss and Grief Handouts

Loss, Grief, and Bereavement | A 35-page PDF packet

Grief Factsheets: My Grief Assist

Printable Grief and Loss Resources | A fairly extensive collection of printable handouts on grief and loss

Anger

Anger Inventory | A 7-page PDF packet

Anger Management | A 13-page PDF packet

Anger Management Techniques | A 4-page PDF

Dealing with Anger (Inner Health Studio) | A 7-page PDF packet

Free Anger Management Worksheets: Letting Go of Anger | A small collection of worksheets for anger management

Getting to Know Your Anger | A 42-page PDF packet

Love To Know: Free Anger Worksheets | 7 downloadable anger management worksheets

Steps for Change: Anger Management Worksheets

Self-Esteem

Confidence Activities | A 25-page PDF packet

Free Self-Esteem Worksheets

Growing Self-Esteem: Self-Esteem Worksheets

Improving Self-Esteem: Healthy Self-Esteem | A 10-page PDF packet

Self-Esteem Activities | A modest collection of handouts/activities for self-esteem

Self-Esteem Experts: Self-Esteem Activities | Printable handouts on self-esteem

Self-Esteem Printable Worksheets

Spiritual Self-Schema Development Worksheets: Yale School of Medicine

Values & Goal-Setting

10 Free Printable Goal-Setting Worksheets (from Parade)

Core Values and Essential Intentions Worksheet | A 2-page PDF worksheet

Core Values Clarification Exercise | A 4-page PDF worksheet

Core Values Worksheet | A 4-page PDF worksheet

Life Values Inventory | A 5-page printable PDF (Source: Brown, Duane and R. Kelly Crace, (1996). Publisher: Life Values Resources, pinnowedna@charter.net)

Personal Values Card Sort | A 9-page printable PDF (Source: W.R. Miller, J. C’de Baca, and D.B.Matthews, P.L., Wilbourne, University of New Mexico, 2001)

Values | A 2-page PDF worksheet

Values and Goals Worksheet | A 1-page PDF worksheet

Values Assessment Worksheet | A 2-page PDF worksheet

Values Exercise | A 2-page PDF worksheet

Values Identification Worksheet | A 6-page PDF worksheet (Source: Synergy Institute Online)

Values Inventory Worksheet | A 2-page PDF worksheet

What Are My Values? | A 4-page PDF worksheet from stephaniefrank.com

Children & Youth

A Child’s Understanding of Death | An 11-page packet

A Collection of Anger Management/Impulse Control Activities & Lesson Plans (PreK-3rd Grade) | A 64-page PDF packet

Activities for Grieving Children | A 7-page PDF

Cope-Cake: Coping Skills Worksheets and Game | A 30-page packet for young children/students

Crossroads Counseling Center: Resources | Handouts on depression, anxiety, ADHD, etc. in children

Curriculum Materials from Pennsylvania Child Welfare Resource Center | Links to handouts

The Helpful Counselor: 10 Awesome Behavior Management Resources | Worksheets to use with children

Myle Marks: Free Downloads | Worksheets for children

Prevention Dimensions: Lesson Plans | Downloadable PDF handouts for children from kindergarten to sixth grade (Source: Utah Education Network)

Printable Worksheets | Worksheets for children on physical activity, substance abuse, nutrition, and more (Source: BJC School Outreach and Youth Development)

Social Emotional Activities Workbook | A 74-page PDF packet

Social Skills Worksheets | A packet of worksheets to use with children/youth

Stress Reduction Activities for Students | Link to a 20-page packet (PDF)

Adolescents & Young Adults

Change To Chill | Worksheets and handouts for reducing stress in teens and young adults

Emotional Intelligence Activities for Teens Ages 13-18 | A 34-page PDF packet

Handouts: Eppler-Wolff Counseling Center (Union College) | Handouts for college students

Healthy Living (Concordia University) | Handouts and articles for college students

Just for Teens: A Personal Plan for Managing Stress | A 7-page PDF handout

Oregon State University: Learning Corner | Student worksheets on time management, wellness, organization skills, etc.

The Relaxation Room (Andrews University) | Self-care and stress management handouts for college students

Resilience Toolkit from Winona State University | PDF handouts for college students on resiliency

Self-Help Resources from Metropolitan Community College Counseling Services | Links to articles for college students on a variety of topics (not in PDF form)

Self-Help (Western Carolina University) | Handouts for college students

Step UP! Program Worksheets and Handouts | Worksheets/handouts for students on prosocial behavior and bystander intervention

Teens Finding Hope: Worksheets and Information to Download | Spanish and English PDFs available

Tip Sheets from Meredith College Counseling Center | Student tip sheets on anger, body image, relationships, and other topics

Tools & Checklists from Campus Mind Works | Handouts and worksheets for students

UC Berkeley University Health Services Resources | Links to handouts, articles, and self-help tools for students

UMatter | Tools for college students on wellness, communication, healthy relationships, and more (Source: Princeton University)

Western Carolina University Counseling and Psychological Services: Self-Help | A modest collection of student wellness handouts along with a printable self-help workbook

Your Life Your Voice (from Boys Town): Tips and Tools | Links to articles and PDF printables on a variety of topics for teens and young adults

Marriage/Relationships & Family

21 Couples Therapy Worksheets, Techniques, & Activities | From Positive Psychology

Articles for Parenting from MomMD | Links to various articles/handouts (not in PDF form)

Drawing Effective Personal Boundaries | A 2-page PDF handout (Source: liveandworkonpurpose.com)

Emotionally Focused Therapy: Forms for Couples | A list of forms to use in EFT couples counseling

Exercises for Forgiveness | A 7-page PDF for recovering from an emotional affair

Healthy Boundaries by Larry L. Winckles | A 3-page PDF handout

Healthy Boundaries Program | A 15-page PDF packet (Source: The University of Toledo Police Department)

Healthy Boundaries vs. Unhealthy Boundaries | A 6-page PDF handout (Source: kimsaeed.com)

Hope Couple: Counseling Resources | Assessments and worksheets from a Christian counseling site

Joy2MeU | A collection of articles by Robert Burney on relationships, codependency, and related topics (not in PDF form)

New Beginnings Family Counseling: Handouts | Click on “Resources” to view and download handouts on relationships, anxiety, and depression. You can also download relationship assessment tools

Pasadena Marriage Counseling: Free Marriage Counseling Resources | A small collection of worksheets for couples therapy

Relationship Counseling Forms | PDF forms for couples therapy (Source: Dan Metevier, Psy.D., Clinical Psychologist)

Signs of Unhealthy Boundaries | A 6-page PDF handout (Source: Healing Private Wounds)

Additional Worksheets & Handouts

8 Helpful “Letting Go of Resentment” Worksheets | Links to PDF worksheets

90-Day Health Challenge | Several health worksheets for download (Source: HealthyCampbell)

Acorns to Oaktrees: Eating Disorder Worksheets/Eating Disorder Forms | A small collection of handouts for eating disorders

Activity eBooks from Rec Therapy Today | A collection of downloadable workbooks on self-esteem, social skills, emotions, etc.

Alzheimer’s Association: Downloadable Resources | Handouts on Alzheimer’s

Attitudes and Behaviour | A 9-page PDF packet on criminal thinking

Commonly Prescribed Psychotropic Medications | A-page PDF (Source: NAMI Minnesota)

Conflict Resolution Skills | A 6-page PDF packet

Coping Skills | A 2-page PDF worksheet (Source: Temple University)

EDA Step Worksheets | From Eating Disorders Anonymous

Experiential Group Exercises for Shame-Resilience | A 4-page PDF packet with questions for discussion and group activities

Free Mindfulness Worksheets (Mindfulness Exercises) | A large collection of mindfulness handouts

Go Your Own Way | Downloads for veterans on various topics

Guilt vs. Shame Infographic: National Institute for the Clinical Application of Behavioral Medicine | Printable infographic to illustrate the differences

Handouts and Worksheets | A 21-page PDF packet with handouts and worksheets on selfe-care topics

Homework and Handouts for Clients: ACT With Compassion | Handouts and worksheets related to self-compassion

Integrated Health and Mental Health Care Tools | Downloadable resources from UIC Center

International OCD Foundation: Assessments & Worksheets | Handouts for use with individuals with OCD

Learning to Forgive: The 5 Steps to Forgiveness | A 6-page PDF handout from Thriveworks

Managing Emotional Intelligence | A 7-page PDF packet (Source: inclusiv.org)

Motivation To Change | A 16-page PDF packet on motivation to change criminal behavior

Peers & Relationships | A 12-page PDF packet on how associates impact criminal behavior

Personal Development: Workplace Strategies for Mental Health | Handouts on resilience, communication, etc.

Prochaska and DiClemente’s Stages of Change Model | A 4-page PDF handout

Quick Reference to Psychotropic Medication | Downloadable PDF chart from John Preston, Psy.D.

Radical Forgiveness: Free Tools | A small collection of worksheets on forgiveness

Reducing Self-Harm | A 5-page PDF

Self-Care and Wellness Resources | Printable handouts and tools (Source: irenegreene.com)

Self-Care Starter Kit from University at Buffalo School of Social Work | Handouts on self-care topics

Self-Directed Recovery | Downloadable resources from UIC Center

Shame Psychoeducation Handout | A 5-page PDF handout

Stages of Change: Primary Tasks | A 2-page PDF handout

Therapy Worksheets: ADHD ReWired | Thought records, behavior charts, and other tools

Understanding and Coping with Guilt and Shame | A 4-page PDF handout

Wellness Toolkits | Printable toolkits from NIH


Please contact me if a link is no longer valid or if you’d like to recommend a site!

Marriage & Relationship Assessment Tools

Free screening tools for assessing relationship satisfaction/expectations, attachment styles, communication, domestic violence/sex addiction, and more.

Compiled by Cassie Jewell, M.Ed., LPC, LSATP

A list of free online interactive and PDF assessment tools for providers working with couples. (See Free Online Screening & Assessment Tools for additional screening tools.)

Relationship Satisfaction & Expectations

The Companionate Love Scale | Link to a PDF version of this scale to measure companionate love; scoring instructions not included

The Couples Satisfaction Index (CSI) | A 4-page PDF assessment to measure relationship satisfaction; scoring instructions included

Feeling Connected in Your Relationship? | An 18-question interactive quiz from PsychCentral

The Gottman Relationship Checkup | Sign up for a free account to access the online interactive assessment

How Deep Is Your Love? Quiz | A 15-question interactive quiz from PsychCentral

How Strong Is Your Relationship? Quiz | A 10-question interactive quiz from PsychCentral

The Marital Disillusionment Scale | Link to a PDF version of this assessment tool

Marital Satisfaction Survey | A PDF scale to evaluate marital satisfaction; click on link listed in the “Interactive Section for Couples”

The Passionate Love Scale | A PDF tool with scoring instructions

Perceived Relationship Quality Components Inventory (PRQC) | Link to a Word version of this scale to assess six components of relationship quality

Quick Compassionate Love Test | A 6-question interactive test from PsychCentral to assess compassion in a relationship

Relationship Assessment Scale | Link to a Word version of this scale with scoring instructions

The Relationship Expectations Questionnaire | A PDF tool; click on link listed in the “Interactive Section for Couples”

Sternberg Triangular Love Test | A 45-question interactive test from PsychCentral to assess intimacy, passion, and commitment

The Sustainable Marriage Quiz | A 10-question interactive quiz from PsychCentral

Attachment Styles

The Attachment Style Assessment | Interactive tool for assessing how you attach to romantic partners; you must submit your email to see your results

Attachment Styles and Close Relationships | Interactive surveys to determine attachment style

Diane Poole Heller’s Attachment Styles Test | Interactive assessment; you must submit your email to see your score

Measure of Attachment Qualities | Measures adult attachment styles (PDF)

Romantic Attachment Quiz | A 41-item quiz from PsychCentral to help you determine your romantic attachment style in relationships

Vulnerable Attachment Style Questionnaire (VASQ) | Links to PDF version of questionnaire and scoring instructions

Communication

The 5 Love Languages | A PDF assessment for assessing primary love “languages”

Interpersonal Communication Skills Inventory | A PDF self-assessment designed to provide insight into communication strengths and areas for development. Includes scoring instructions.

Interpersonal Communication Skills Test – Abridged | Interactive test from PsychCentral

Learn Your Love Language | An online quiz for couples to determine primary love language(s). (You are required to enter your information to get quiz results.)

Nonverbal Immediacy Scale | Online interactive tool for assessing differences in the use of body language when communicating; printable version here

Open DISC Assessment Test | Online interactive tool for assessing your communication style

Self-Perceived Communication Competence Scale | Printable scale with scoring instructions

Willingness To Communicate | Printable assessment with scoring instructions

Willingness To Listen | Printable assessment with scoring instructions

Domestic Violence & Sex Addiction

Danger Assessment Screening Tool | Clinicians can download a PDF version of this assessment, which helps predict the level of danger in an abusive relationship; this screening tool was developed to predict violence and homicide.

Domestic Violence Assessment Tools | Five assessments from the Domestic Shelters site

Domestic Violence Screening Quiz | Interactive test from PsychCentral to determine if you’re involved in a dangerous abusive relationship

Sexual Addiction Quiz | A brief screening measure from PsychCentral to help you determine if you are struggling with sexual addiction

Additional Relationship Assessment Tools

20 Question Self-Assessment for Healthy Boundaries | Download a PDF assessment created by Dr. Jane Bolton; scoring instructions not included

Brief Index of Sexual Functioning for Women (BISF-W) | Subscription required to access assessment tool

Desire to Have Children Scale | Link to a Word version of this scale

Emotional Intelligence Quiz | An online interactive test to measure how well you read other people

Empathy Quiz | An online interactive test to measure empathy

Evaluations of Attractiveness Scale: Female Attractiveness | Male Attractiveness | Online interactive tests for assessing preferences

Ideal Partner and Ideal Relationship Scales | Link to Word scales to assess ideal partner attributes and ideal relationship qualities

Interactive Behavioral Couple Therapy Questionnaires | 5 downloadable PDF assessments for couples

Jealousy Instrument | Link to a PDF version of this instrument; scoring instructions not included

Love Attitudes Scale | Link to a Word version of this scale that measures different love styles; scoring instructions included

Marital Forgiveness Scale-Event | Marital Forgiveness Scale (Dispositional) | Links to PDF versions of scales with scoring instructions

Marital Offense-Specific Forgiveness Scale | Link to a PDF version of this scale; scoring instructions not included

Perceptions of Love and Sex Scale | Link to a Word version of this scale with scoring instructions

The Relational Assessment Questionnaire | Link to a PDF version of this questionnaire (with scoring instructions) to measure relational aspects of self

Relationship Trust Quiz | An online interactive tool

Respect Toward Partner Scale | Link to a Word version of this scale (with scoring key)

Romantic Partner Conflict Scale (RPCS) | Link to a PDF version of this scale with scoring instructions; Word version also available

The Sexual Disgust Inventory | PDF scale with scoring instructions

The Spann-Fischer Codependency Scale | A 16-item scale (PDF) to measure codependency

Susceptibility to Infidelity Instrument | Link to a PDF version of this instrument and information on scoring

Trust Scale | PDF tool for assessing trust within close interpersonal relationships

Free Printable PDF Workbooks, Manuals, & Toolkits for Providers Who Work with Children, Adolescents, & Families

(Updated 2/10/20) A resource list for providers who work with youth and families. Free PDF manuals for clinicians and handouts/guides for families.

Compiled by Cassie Jewell, M.Ed., LPC, LSATP

The original source for this list is my post, Free Printable PDF Workbooks, Manuals, & Self-Help Guides. However, the “Children, Youth, & Families” section was becoming too lengthy. The purpose of this post is to organize the youth and family resources so you can quickly find what you’re looking for. This post is divided into two sections: one for providers and one for families.

For Providers

Treatment Manuals/CURRICULUMs & Workbooks

Mood & Anxiety Disorders

Adolescent Coping with Depression Course: Leader’s Manual for Adolescent Groups (321 pages) | Student Workbook (199 pages) | Leader’s Manual for Parent Groups (139 pages) | Parent Workbook (73 pages) (Source: Kaiser Permanete for Health Research) (Find more information here)

The Adolescent Coping with Stress Course: An Eight-Session Curriculum Developed for the Prevention of Unipolar Depression in Adolescents with an Increased Future Risk: Leader Manual (118 pages) | Adolescent Workbook (79 pages) (Source: Kaiser Permanete for Health Research) (Find more information here)

The Adolescent Coping with Stress Course: A Fifteen-Session Class Curriculum Developed for the Prevention of Unipolar Depression in Adolescents with an Increased Future Risk: Leader Manual (112 pages) | Adolescent Workbook (82 pages) (Source: Kaiser Permanete for Health Research) (Find more information here)

Break Free from Depression: A 4-Session Curriculum Addressing Adolescent Depression (Source: Suicide Prevention Resource Center)

Managing Depression: A Facilitator’s Guide for Working with Groups of Women Living with Depression During Pregnancy, After Delivery and Beyond (Source: Best Start, 42 pages)

STEADY: Intervention Manual (107 pages) | Adolescent Workbook (87 pages) (Source: Kaiser Permanete for Health Research) (Find more information here)

Substance Use Disorders

Matrix Series (Intensive Outpatient Treatment for People with Stimulant Use Disorders): Counselor’s Family Education Manual (Source: SAMHSA, 176 pages)

A Modified DBT Group Therapy Manual

Partners In Parenting: A DATAR/FIRST CHOICE Treatment Manual (Source: Texas Institute of Behavioral Research at TCU, 294 pages) 2002

Trauma & Related Disorders

Dealing With Trauma: A TF-CBT Workbook for Teens (Source: The National Child Traumatic Stress Network, Medical University of South Carolina, 35 pages) (Link to facilitator training here)

The T.O.P. Workbook for Sexual Health: Facilitator’s Manual (Source: Resources for Resolving Violence, Inc., 87 pages) 2010 (Purchase additional workbooks/manuals here)

Triad Girls’ Group Treatment Manual (Source: The Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, University of South Florida, 201 pages) (More information on the Triad Project here)

Anger

Getting Along and Keeping It Cool: How Anger Works (Therapist Group Manual) (Source: Centre for Clinical Interventions with YouthLink, 79 pages)

Self-Esteem

On My Own Two Feet Series: Identity and Self-Esteem (76 pages) | Understanding Influences (103 pages) | Assertive Communication (121 pages) | Feelings (83 pages) | Decision Making (113 pages) | Consequences (81 pages) | Work Cards (129 pages) (Source: Department of Education and Skills and Professional Development Services for Teachers) (Find more information here)

LGBTQ Youth

Growing Up Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or Transgender (Source: Department of Education and Skills and the Health Service Executive through the Social, Personal and Health Education Support Service, in conjunction with GLEN [Gay and Lesbian Equality Network] and BeLonG To Youth Services; and Professional Development Services for Teachers, 82 pages) (Find more information here)

It Gets Better: A Group Experience for LGBTQ Youth (Group Curriculum Outline) (Source: Catherine Griffith, Ph.D., 13 pages)

Latinix Youth

Latino Multifamily Group Program Manual, (Source: Valley Nonprofit Resources, 64 pages)

Health & Wellness

Be Real. Be Ready. (A comprehensive relationship and sexuality curriculum for high school students) (Source: Adolescent Health Working Group)

Healthy Living, Healthy Minds: A Toolkit for Health Professionals (Promoting Healthy Living in Children and Youth with Mental Health Challenges) (149 pages) | Healthy Living… It’s in Everyone (A Companion Workbook, 82 pages) (Source: BC Mental Health and Substance Use Services)

TRUST (Talking. Relationships. Understanding Sexuality. Teaching Resource.) Workbook (Source: National Council for Curriculum and Assessment; Department of Education and Science, the Health Service Executive, and Crisis Pregnancy Agency; and Department of Education and Skills and Professional Development Services for Teachers, 126 pages) (Find more information here)

Group Counseling Resources

A Collection of Icebreakers and Connection Activities (33 pages)

Favorite Therapeutic Activities for Children, Adolescents, and Families: Practitioners Share Their Most Effective Interventions (Source: Edited by Liana Lowenstein, MSW, 119 pages)

Group Counseling Guide (Group activities for children) (Source: Rita Zniber Foundation, 45 pages)

Toolkits & Guides

Alcohol Problems in Intimate Relationships: Identification and Intervention (A Guide for Marriage and Family Therapists) (Source: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 83 pages)

Behavioral Health: Adolescent Provider Toolkit (Source: Adolescent Health Working Group)

Body Basics: Adolescent Provider Toolkit (Source: Adolescent Health Working Group)

Child Trauma Toolkit for Educators (Source: The National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 21 pages)

Community Reinforcement and Family Training Support and Prevention (Source: U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, 103 pages)

A Practitioner’s Resource Guide: Helping Families to Support Their LBGT Children (Source: SAMHSA, 18 pages)

Promoting Emotional Resilience: Helping children to find ways to function in a world where bad things happen – A Resource Pack (Source: West Sussex CAMHS and School Attendance Project, 141 pages) 2008

Sexual Health: Adolescent Provider Toolkit (Source: Adolescent Health Working Group

Stress Lessons Toolkit (Source: Psychology Foundation of Canada in partnership with Pfizer Canada, 52 pages) 2012

Trauma & Resilience: Adolescent Provider Toolkit (Source: Adolescent Health Working Group)

The Use of a Full Family Assessment to Identify the Needs of Families with Multiple Problems (Source: UK Department for Education, 105 pages)

For Families

Workbooks For Children & Adolescents

Anxiety Toolbox: Student Workbook (42 pages)

COPE (CAPS COPING SKILLS SEMINAR): Student Workbook (Source: West Carolina University Counseling and Psychological Services, 28 pages)

Dealing With Depression: Antidepressant Skills for Teens (Source: Vancouver Psych Safety Consulting Incorporated, 68 pages)

Just as I Am Workbook: A Guided Journal to Free Yourself from Self-Criticism and Feelings of Low Self-Worth (Source: Queen’s University, 56 pages)

Lemons or Lemonade? An Anger Workbook for Teens (Source: Jane F. Gilgun, PhD, LICSW, Education4Health, 38 pages)

Mighty Moe: An Anxiety Workbook for Children (Source: Lacey Woloshyn, 79 pages)

Safe Spot Stress Management Series

Safe Spot: Stress Management Workbook 1 – What Is Stress? (45 pages)

Safe Spot: Stress Management Workbook 2 – Behaviour and Stress (27 pages)

Safe Spot: Stress Management Workbook 3 – Thought Patterns and Stress (29 pages)

Safe Spot: Stress Management Workbook 4 – Problem-Solving and Well-Being (27 pages)

Your Best You: Improving Your Mood (Source: Queen’s University, 103 pages)

Your Best You: Managing Your Anxiety (Source: Queen’s University, 169 pages)

Youth Transition Workbook (Source: Pennsylvania Youth Leadership Network/The Rhode Island Transition Council/The Rhode Island Department of Health Youth Advisory Council, 68 pages) 2017

Toolkits & Guides

For Parents & Caregivers

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (Information for Families) (Source: BC Mental Health and Substance Use Services, 12 pages)

After an Attempt A Guide for Taking Care of Your Family Member after Treatment in the Emergency Department (12 pages) | Spanish Version (14 pages) (Source: SAMHSA)

After a Loved One Dies – How Children Grieve and How Parents and Other Adults Can Support Them (Source: New York Life, 24 pages)

Bipolar Disorder in Children and Teens: A Parent’s Guide (Information Booklet) (Source: National Institute of Mental Health, Hosford Clinic, 27 pages)

Bipolar Disorder: Parents’ Medication Guide for Bipolar Disorder in Children & Adolescents (Source: American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 63 pages)

Borderline Personality Disorder: An Information Guide for Families (Source: CAMH, 72 pages)

Coping with Anxiety During Pregnancy and Following the Birth: A Cognitive Therapy-Based Self-Management Guide for Women and Health Care Providers (Source: BC Mental Health and Substance Use Services, 178 pages)

Coping with Depression During Pregnancy and Following the Birth: A Cognitive Therapy-Based Self-Management Guide for Women (Source: BC Mental Health and Substance Use Services, 118 pages)

Coping with Separation Anxiety Handbook (Source: BC Legal Services Society, 24 pages)

Emotional Intelligence Activities for Teens Ages 13-18 (Source: The Ohio National Guard, 34 pages)

Families in Transition: A Resource Guide for Families of Transgender Youth (Source: Central Toronto Youth Services, 56 pages)

A Family Guide to Concurrent Disorders (Source: CAMH, 222 pages)

Gaining Control of Your Life After Having a Baby: A Self-Help Workbook for Post-natal Depression (Source: Maternal Mental Health Alliance, 38 pages)

Managing Depression: A Self-Help Skills Resource for Women Living with Depression During Pregnancy, After Delivery and Beyond (Source: Best Start, 57 pages)

The Mind Body Connection and Somatization: A Family Handbook (Source: BC Mental Health and Substance Use Services, 46 pages)

Oppositional Defiant Disorder: A Guide for Families by the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (18 pages)

Patient & Family Guide to Second-Generation Antipsychotics (Source: BC Mental Health and Substance Use Services, 44 pages)

Postnatal Depression and Perinatal Mental Health (Source: Mind UK, 31 pages)

Recognizing Resilience: A Workbook for Parents and Caregivers of Teens Involved with Substances (Source: BC Mental Health and Substance Use Services, 104 pages)

A Resource Guide for Families Dealing with Mental Illness (Source: Michigan National Alliance on Mental Health, 40 pages)

Suicide Prevention for Consumers and Family Members (Source: Montgomery County Emergency Service, Inc., 26 pages)

Tools & Resources (Toolkit for Families) (Source: Kelty Mental Health, 25 pages)

What Community Members Can Do: Helping Children and Adolescents Cope with Violence and Disasters (For Teachers, Clergy, and Other Adults in the Community) (Information Booklet) (Source: National Institute of Mental Health, Hosford Clinic, 20 pages)

For Youth & Adolescents

Healthy Living for Teens (Source: BC Mental Health and Substance Use Services, 23 pages)

A Sibling’s Guide to Psychosis: Information, Ideas, and Resources (Source: Canada Mental Health Association, 34 pages)

Student Life (Source: Mind UK, 22 pages)

Unconventional Coping Strategies

A list of uncommon strategies for coping with stress, depression, and anxiety. Includes a free PDF version of the list to print and use as a handout.

By Cassie Jewell, M.Ed., LPC, LSATP

With Lauren Mills, MA, LPC-Intern (Contributor)

Effective coping skills make it possible to survive life’s stressors, obstacles, and hardships. Without coping strategies, life would be unmanageable. Dr. Constance Scharff described coping mechanisms as “skills we… have that allow us to make sense of our negative experiences and integrate them into a healthy, sustainable perspective of the world.” Healthy coping strategies promote resilience when experiencing minor stressors, such as getting a poor performance review at work, or major ones, such as the loss of a loved one.

Like any skill, coping is important to practice on a regular basis in order to be effective. Do this by maintaining daily self-care (at a minimum: adequate rest, healthy meals, exercise, staying hydrated, and avoiding drugs/alcohol.)

As an expert on you (and how you adapt to stressful situations), you may already know what helps the most when life seems out-of-control. (I like reading paranormal romance/fantasy-type books!) Maybe you meditate or run or rap along to loud rap music or have snuggle time with the cats or binge watch your favorite show on Netflix. Having insight into/awareness of your coping strategies primes you for unforeseeable tragedies in life.

“Life is not what it’s supposed to be. It’s what it is. The way you cope with it is what makes the difference.”

Virginia Satir, Therapist (June 26, 2019-September 10, 1988)

Healthy coping varies greatly from person to person; what matters is that your personal strategies work for you. For example, one person may find prayer helpful, but for someone who isn’t religious, prayer might be ineffective. Instead, they may swim laps at the gym when going through a difficult time. Another person may cope by crying and talking it out with a close friend.

Note: there are various mental health treatment approaches (i.e. DBT, trauma-focused CBT, etc.) that incorporate specialized, evidence-based coping techniques that are proven to work (by reducing symptoms and improving wellbeing) for certain disorders. The focus of this post is basic coping, not treatment interventions.

On the topic of coping skills, the research literature is vast (and beyond the scope of this post). While many factors influence coping (i.e. personality/temperament, stressors experienced, mental and physical health, etc.), evidence backs the following methods: problem-solving techniques, mindfulness/meditation, exercise, relaxation techniques, reframing, acceptance, humor, seeking support, and religion/spirituality. (Note that venting is not on the list!) Emotional intelligence may also play a role in the efficiency of coping skills.

Current research

In 2011, researchers found that positive reframes, acceptance, and humor were the most effective copings skills for students dealing with small setbacks. The effect of humor as a positive coping skill has been found in prior studies, several of which focused on coping skills in the workplace.

A sport psychology study indicated that professional golfers who used positive self-talk, blocked negative thoughts, maintained focus, and remained in a relaxed state effectively coped with stress, keeping a positive mindset. Effective copers also sought advice as needed throughout the game. A 2015 study suggested that helping others, even strangers, helps mitigate the impact of stress.


Examples of coping skills include prayer, meditation, deep breathing, exercise, talking to a trusted person, journaling, cleaning, and creating art. However, the purpose of this post is to provide coping alternatives. Maybe meditation isn’t your thing or journaling leaves you feeling like crap. Coping is not one-size-fits-all. The best approach to coping is to find and try lots of different things!

The inspiration for this post came from Facebook. (Facebook is awesome for networking! I’m a member of several professional groups.) Lauren Mills sought ideas for unconventional strategies via Facebook… With permission, I’m sharing some of them here!    

Unconventional Coping Strategies

1) Crack pistachio nuts

2) Fold warm towels

3) Smell your dog (Fun fact: dog paws smell like corn chips!) or watch them sleep

4) Peel dried glue off your hands

5) Break glass at the recycling center

6) Pop bubble wrap

7) Lie upside down

8) Watch slime or pimple popping videos on YouTube

9) Sort and build Lego’s

10) Write in cursive

11) Observe fish in an aquarium

12) Twirl/spin around

13) Solve math problems (by hand)

14) Use a voice-changing app (Snapchat works too) to repeat back your worry/critical thoughts in the voice of a silly character OR sing your worries/thoughts aloud to the tune of “Happy Birthday”

15) Listen to the radio in foreign languages

16) Chop vegetables

17) Go for a joy ride (Windows down!)

18) Watch YouTube videos of cute animals and/or giggling babies

19) Blow bubbles

20) Walk barefoot outside

21) Draw/paint on your skin

22) Play with (dry) rice

23) Do (secret) “random acts of kindness”

24) Play with warm (not hot) candle wax

25) Watch AMSR videos on YouTube

26) Shuffle cards

27) Recite family recipes

28) Find the nicest smelling flowers at a grocery store

29) Count things

30) Use an app to try different hairstyles and/or makeup

31) People-watch with a good friend and make up stories about everyone you see (Take it to the next level with voiceovers!)

32) Wash your face mindfully

33) Buy a karaoke machine and sing your heart out when you’re home alone

34) On Instagram, watch videos of a hydraulic press smash things, cake decorating, pottery/ceramics throwing, hand lettering, and/or woodwork

35) Shine tarnished silver

36) Create a glitter jar and enjoy

37) Tend to plants

38) Color in a vulgar coloring book for adults


Download a PDF version (free) of “Unconventional Coping Strategies” below. This handout can be printed, copied, and shared without the author’s permission, providing it’s not used for monetary gain. Please modify as needed.


Lauren Mills, MA, LPC-Intern (Supervised by Mary Ann Satori, LPC-S) is a therapist in Texas and a current resident in counseling.     

I’d like to acknowledge all members of Therapist Toolbox – Resources & Support for Therapists who submitted ideas!

If you have an uncommon coping skill, post in a comment!


References

Association for Psychological Science. (2015, December 14). Helping others dampens effects of everyday stress. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 13, 2020 from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/12/151214084744.htm

Canisius College. (2008, January 26). Laughter is the best medicine. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 13, 2020 from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080124200913.htm

Loyola University Health System. (2018, September 21). Boosting emotional intelligence in physicians can protect against burnout. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 12, 2020 from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/09/180921140200.htm

Scharff, C. (2016). Understanding and choosing better coping skills: You can change your mood without drugs. Psychology today. Retrived from https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/ending-addiction-good/201609/understanding-and-choosing-better-coping-skills

University of Alberta. (2005, June 18). A good game of golf: Mind over matter. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 13, 2020 from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050617235448.htm

University of Kent. (2011, July 14). Positive reframing, acceptance and humor are the most effective coping strategies. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 12, 2020 from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110704082700.htm

Wiley-Blackwell. (2008, April 9). Humor plays an important role in healthcare even when patients are terminally ill. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 13, 2020 from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080408112104.htm