Mental Health, Wellness, and Personal Development Blogs to Follow

A list of 30+ mental health, wellness, and personal development blogs

Compiled by Cassie Jewell, LPC, LSATP

blogs to follow

Creating Mind ReMake Project opened my eyes to a whole world of blogs! There are tons of informative and thought-provoking blog sites out there that share my “niche.” This post lists a variety of blogs related to mental health, wellness, and personal development.

meditation-1287207_1920

 

  1. ACA Counseling Corner Blog

“Thoughtful ideas, suggestions, and strategies for helping you to live a happier and healthier life”

 

  1. Aim Hypnotherapy Blog

Therapist and blogger Aigin Larki blogs about anxiety, addiction, stress, and other mental health topics

 

  1. Anxiety Free World

A blog about coping with anxiety

 

  1. Beyond Meds

Award-winning blog written by ex-patient and mental health professional, Monica Cassani, on topics related to psychotropic meds and mental health

 

  1. Blue Light Blue

Amy McDowell Marlow, a 22-year survivor of suicide loss who lives with mental illness (bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder), blogs about living with mental illness

 

  1. Brave Over Perfect

Dr. Christine Carter and Susie Rinehart write about personal growth topics

 

  1. Brené Brown Blog

Personal growth and development blog

 

  1. David’s Blog

Dr. David Healy is a psychiatrist, psychopharmacologist, scientist, and author who blogs about pharmacology and mental health

 

  1. Dr. David Susman Blog

A clinical psychologist, mental health advocate, professor, and writer shares resources and inspiration for better mental health

 

  1. Dr. Melissa Welby Blog

Psychiatry and well-being

 

  1. Dr. Sarah Ravin Blog

A clinical psychologist blogs about psychological issues and evidence-based treatments

 

  1. Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board News

If you live in Fairfax County, VA, sign up for CSB news to receive updates and links to helpful resources

 

  1. The Fractured Light

Living with borderline personality disorder

 

  1. Gardening Love

A unique wellness and lifestyle blog about enhancing mental health and well-being through gardening

 

  1. Healthy Place Blogs

A collection of mental health blogs

 

  1. Heather LeGuilloux Blog

A therapist blogs about mental health topics

 

  1. Info Counselling – Evidence based therapy techniques

Learn about the latest evidence-based treatments and download free therapy worksheets

 

  1. Kim’s Counseling Corner

Kim Peterson, a licensed professional counselor, created Kim’s Counseling Corner, a site with a variety of free downloadable resources for clinicians

 

  1. Love and Life Toolbox

Award-winning blog founded by Lisa Brookes Kift, marriage and family therapist, about marriages, relationships, and emotional health

 

  1. Mindcology

Mental health and self-help posts written by psychologists, counselors, and other mental health practitioners

 

  1. The Mighty

“A digital health community created to empower and connect people facing health challenges and disabilities”

 

  1. Momentus Institute Blog

A blog dedicated to building and repairing the social emotional health of children

 

  1. MQ Blog

A blog about transforming mental health care through research

 

  1. My Brain’s Not Broken

Living with mental illness

 

  1. NAMI Blog

Advocacy blog

 

  1. On Being Patient

Personal accounts of living with mental illness

 

  1. Our Parent Place

A place for parents with mental illness to connect and learn

 

  1. PsychCentral Mental Health and Psychology Blogs

Blog posts by experts, professionals, and ordinary people who share their insights on a variety of mental health topics

 

  1. Psychology Today Blogs

A large collection of blogs on psychology-related topics, including creativity, intelligence, memory, parenting, and more

 

  1. SAMHSA Blog

“A place where up-to-date information including articles from SAMHSA staff, announcements of new programs, links to reports, grant opportunities, and ways to connect to other resources are located”

 

  1. A Splintered Mind

Douglas Scootey blogs about “overcoming ADHD and depression with lots of humor and attitude”

 

  1. Survival Is a Talent

“A digital platform for individuals to share their Stories of Survival relating to health and wellness”

 

  1. Thriving While Disabled

A blog about living with a disability

 

  1. Your Brain Health 

Dr. Sarah McKay, neuroscientist and blogger, writes about topics related to neurology and mental health


Know of a great blog? Post in a comment!

Free Online Assessment and Screening Tools for Mental Health

Access a variety of assessment tools for mental health and related issues, including mood disorders, relationship attachment styles, suicide risk, communication skills, and domestic violence. This list includes both self-assessments and screening tools for clinicians to administer and score.

Compiled by Cassie Jewell, LPC, LSATP

Updated July 23, 2018

How toDIY Your Whole Wedding

The following list will link you to a variety of mental health assessments and screenings. While an assessment can not take the place of a clinical diagnosis, it can give you a better idea if what you’re experiencing is “normal” (when compared to the general population). If your results indicate you may have a problem, it would be wise to schedule an appointment with a therapist or psychologist. (Print your results and bring them with you.)

I’ve also listed sites providing links to tools (including PDF printables) for mental health professionals to use with their clients.

 

Free Online Assessment and Screening Tools for Mental Health

20 Questions: Are You a Compulsive Gambler?

A short interactive self-assessment  

ACE Questionnaire 

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with a variety of health (both physical and mental) conditions in adults. To find your ACE score, take an interactive quiz. Learn more about ACEs on the CDC’s violence prevention webpage.

You can also download the international version (PDF) from the World Health Organization’s Violence and Injury Prevention webpage.

ADAA Screening Tools

The Anxiety and Depression Association of America provides links to both printable and interactive tests for depression, generalized anxiety disorder, OCD, panic disorder, PTSD, social anxiety disorder, and specific phobias. This site does not provide test results. (It’s recommended that you print your results to discuss with a mental health practitioner.) This is an excellent resource for clinicians to print and administer to clients.  

Adult ADHD Assessment Tools

Links to a PDF toolkit for clinicians. Includes Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale-V.1.1. (ASRS-V1.1) Symptom Checklist,  Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale-V1.1. (ASRS-V1.1) Screener (English), Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale-V1.1. (ASRS-V1.1) Screener (Spanish),  Barkley’s Quick-Check for Adult ADHD Diagnosis (Sample),  Brief Semi-Structured Interview for ADHD in Adults,  Weiss Functional Impairment Rating Scale Self-Report (WFIRS-S), ADHD Medication Side Effects Checklist, Medication Response Form, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), and CAGE Questionnaire Adapted to Include Drugs

AlcoholScreening.org

An interactive test that gives personalized results based on age, gender, and drinking patterns

Assessment Instruments Developed at the Center for Trauma and the Community

Access the Trauma History Questionnaire and the Stressful Life Events Screening Questionnaire

Career Assessments

Self-assessments to assess interests, skills, and work values

Depression Self-Assessment

A simple self-assessment tool from Kaiser. Results are provided on a spectrum, ranging from “None” to “Severe” depression.

Domestic Violence Screening Quiz (from PsychCentral)

Interactive test to determine if you’re involved in a dangerous abusive relationship

DrugScreening.org

An interactive test that provides feedback about the likely risks of your drug use and where to find more information, evaluation, and help

Danger Assessment Screening Tool

Clinicians can download a PDF version of this assessment, which helps predict the level of danger in an abusive relationship; this screening tool was developed to predict violence and homicide.

DBSA Mental Health Screening Center

The Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance offers screening tools for both children and adults (including versions for parents to answers questions about their child’s symptoms). Take an online assessment for depression, mania, and/or anxiety.

Drug Abuse Screening Test DAST-10

For clinician use, a PDF version of the DAST-10 – does not give results or scoring instructions

ePROVIDE

For clinical or academic use only. Register to access a variety of assessment tools including Adherence to a Healthy Lifestyle questionnaire (AHLQ), Eating Disorder Inventory, Brief Evaluation of Medication Influences and Beliefs, Marwit Meuser Caregiver Grief Inventory, the Hooked on Nicotine Checklist, Body-Q, and more.

Financial Well-Being Questionnaire

Take this 10-question interactive test and receive a score (along with helpful financial tips)

Grief and Loss Quiz (from PsychCentral)

Take this test to learn if you may be suffering from complicated grief

Happiness Test (from Psychology Today)

A 20-minute interactive test – free snapshot report with the option to buy the full report for $4.95

Interpersonal Communication Skills Inventory

A PDF self-assessment designed to provide insight into communication strengths and areas for development. Includes scoring instructions.

Keirsey

Take this interactive assessment to learn your temperament. (There are four temperaments: Artisan, Guardian, Idealist, and Rational.) My results were consistent with my Myers-Brigg personality type. (Note: You must create an account and enter a password to view your results.)

Library of Scales (from Outcome Tracker)

25 psychiatric scales (PDF documents) to be used by mental health practitioners in clinical practice. Includes Frequency, Intensity, and Burden of Side Effects Ratings; Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence; Fear Questionnaire; Massachusetts General Hospital Hair Pulling Scale; and more. (Note: Some of the assessments have copyright restrictions for use.)

Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale

Take an interactive self-assessment (from the National Social Anxiety Center) to assess for social anxiety

Mental Health Screening Tools

Online screenings for depression, anxiety, bipolar, psychosis, eating disorders, PTSD, and addiction. You can also take a parent test (for a parent to assess their child’s symptoms), a youth test (for a youth to report his/her symptoms), or a workplace health test. The site includes resources and self-help tools.

The Mood Disorder Questionnaire

A PDF screening tool for clinicians to assess symptoms of bipolar disorder

The National Sleep Foundation Sleepiness Test

An interactive test to assess if you are more or less sleepy than the general population

NORC Diagnostic Screen for Gambling Disorders Self-Administered (from the National Council on Problem Gambling)

An interactive 10-question test to assess gambling behaviors

Open Source Psychometrics Project

This site provides a collection of interactive personality and other tests, including the Open Extended Jungian Type Scales, the Evaluations of Attractiveness Scales, and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. On the whole, I’m doubtful of the scientific accuracy of the assessments. (For example, I took the site’s DISC assessment; my score did not match the score I received when I took the certified test through my employer.) Furthermore, the site’s “About” section maintains, “[The site] exists to educate the public… and also to collect research data.” (Collect research data? For who/what?) I would recommend using the site mainly for entertainment purposes (ornot at all if you’re concerned about how your personal data is handled).

Patient Health Questionnaire Screeners

This is a great diagnostic tool for clinicians. Use the drop down arrow to choose a PHQ or GAD screener (which assesses mood, anxiety, eating, sleep, and somatic concerns). The site generates a PDF printable; you can also access the instruction manual. No permission is required to reproduce, translate, display or distribute the screeners.

Project Implicit

A variety of interactive assessments that measures your hidden biases

Psychology Tools

Online self-assessments for addiction, ADHD, aggression, anxiety, autism spectrum, bipolar, depression, eating disorders, OCD, and personality.

Note: These tests may not be entirely accurate. I took the Personality Type Indicator (PTI), which supposedly assesses Myers-Briggs personality type. According to the PTI, I’m an ESFJ… and I’m (indisputably) an INTP. (I’ve taken the Myers-Briggs test, several times, with consistent results.) Then again, I took the Social Phobia Inventory, which correctly assessed my social anxiety, and the Bergen Shopping Addiction Scale, which validated my online shopping habits!

Recovery Assessment Scales

A variety of assessments for individuals recovering from psychiatric illnesses

Risk-Taking Test (from PsychTests)

Self-test to assess your risk-taking behaviors – Receive a snapshot report with an option to buy the full report

Romantic Attachment Quiz (from PsychCentral)

A 41-item quiz to help you determine your romantic attachment style in relationships

SAMHSA Screening Tools

Valid and reliable screening tools for clinicians. This sites links you to PDF versions of assessments/screenings for depression, drug/alcohol use, bipolar disorder, suicide risk, anxiety disorders, and trauma.

The SAPA Project

SAPA stands for “Synthetic Aperture Personality Assessment.” This online personality assessment scores you on 27 “narrow traits,” such as order, impulsivity, and creativity in addition to the “Big Five” (Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Neuroticism, and Openness). You’re also scored on cognitive ability. This test takes 20-30 minutes to complete and you will receive a full report when finished.

My results were, for the most part, indicative of my personality. Here’s the description from my “Order” score: “Your score on the Order scale indicates that you are low in orderliness. This suggests that tidiness is not a top priority for you… You don’t waste time organizing everything to be just perfect but this means others may sometimes view you to be a bit messy.” (If you’ve seen my desk, you know this to be true!)

SCOFF (A Quick Assessment for Eating Concerns Based on the SCOFF)

A screening tool for eating problems

Self-Compassion Scale

Links to a PDF version of the SCS (which assesses self-kindness, self-judgment, mindfulness, and more)

Sexual Addiction Screening (from PsychCentral)

A brief screening measure to help you determine if you are struggling with sexual addiction

Similar Minds

A fun site for personality tests. (For entertainment only purposes!)

Sleep Assessments from Sleep and Chronobiology Center (University of Pittsburgh)

Download PDF versions of instruments to assess sleep quality, including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Insomnia Symptom Questionnaire

Sleep Disorders Screening Survey

A short, interactive test to screen for sleep disorders

SOCRATES

A PDF version of the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale for clinicians to assess readiness to change in alcohol users

Stanford Medicine WellMD

Self-tests for altruism, anxiety, burnout, depression, emotional intelligence, empathy, happiness, mindfulness, physical fitness, PTSD, relationship trust, self-compassion, sleepiness, stress, substance use, and work-life balance

The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire

Links to several downloadable versions of the SDQ, which is designed to measure behavioral issues in children ages 4-17

Stress Self-Assessments (from The American Institute of Stress)

A variety of self-assessments to measure stress

Stress Test (from PsychCentral)

A 5-minute interactive test to measure your stress level

Suicide Risk Screening Tool

One-page PDF screening tool for clinicians (from the National Institute of Mental Health)

Wellness Self-Assessment

A PDF-version of Princeton University’s tool to measure your wellness in seven dimensions (emotional, environmental, intellectual, occupational, physical, social, and spiritual) – Calculate your results and then create an action plan.

The World Sleep Study

Take this short test to learn your sleep score and then answer additional questions to create a sleep profile.


If you know of a free online assessment for mental health that’s not listed in this post, please share in a comment! Contact me if a link is not working.

Where Can I Find Help?

Where can you find the help you need? While there are plenty of resources out there for mental health and recovery, they’re not always easy to find… or affordable. (Plus, the Internet is full of scams!) This article is a starting point for getting help when you aren’t sure where to turn. This post offers practical guidelines; all of the resources in this article are trustworthy and reliable… and will point you in the right direction.

By Cassie Jewell, LPC, LSATP

the ultimate resource list for mental health professionals (2).png

This post is not comprehensive; rather, it’s a starting point for getting the help you need. There are plenty of resources out there for mental health and recovery, but they’re not always easy to find (or affordable). The resources in this post are trustworthy and reliable… and will point you in the right direction.

If you need treatment for mental health or substance use, but aren’t sure how to find it…

If you have insurance, check your insurer’s website.

For substance use and mental health disorders, you can access the SAMHSA treatment locator. You can find buprenorphine treatment (medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction) through SAMHSA as well.

Consider using Mental Health America’s interactive tool, Where to Get Help. NeedyMeds.org also has a locator to help you find low-cost mental health and substance abuse clinics.

Additionally, you could contact your local Mental Health America Affiliate for advice and/or referrals.

If you can’t afford therapy…

EAP (employee assistance programs) frequently offer free (time-limited) counseling sessions.

At campus counseling centers, grad students sometimes offer free or low-cost services.

You could look into community mental health centers or local churches (pastoral counseling).

In some areas, you may be able to find pro bono counseling services. (Google “pro bono counseling” or “free therapy.”) You may also be able to connect with a peer specialist or counselor (for free) instead of seeing a licensed therapist.

As an alternative to individual counseling, you could attend a support group (self-help) or therapy group; check hospitals, churches, and community centers. The DBSA peer-lead support group locator tool will help you find local support groups. Meetup.com may also have support group options.

Additional alternatives: Consider online forums or communities. Watch or read self-help materials. Buy a workbook (such as The Cognitive Behavioral Workbook for Depression: A Step-By-Step Program) from amazon.com. Download a therapy app.

Lastly, you could attend a free workshop or class at a local church, the library, a college or university, a community agency, or a hospital.

If you’re under 18 and need help, but your parents won’t let you see a counselor (or “don’t believe in therapy”)…

Some, but not all, states require parental consent for adolescents to participate in therapy. Start by looking up the laws in your state. You may be able to see a treatment provider without consent from a legal guardian. If your state is one that mandates consent, consider scheduling an appointment with your school counselor. In many schools, school counseling is considered a regular educational service and does not require parental consent.

Self-help groups, while not a substitute for mental health treatment, provide a venue for sharing your problems in a supportive environment. (If you suffer from a mental health condition, use NAMI to locate a support group in your state. If you struggle with addiction, consider AA or NA.)

Alternatively, you could join an online forum or group. (Mental Health America offers an online community with over 1 million users and NAMI offers OK2Talk, an online community for adolescents and young adults.)

You could also contact a Mental Health America Affiliate who would be able to tell you about local resources and additional options.

If you’re in crisis, call the Boys Town Hotline at 1-800-448-3000 or the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-TALK. Alternatively, you can text HOME to 741741 to text with a trained crisis counselor.

Lastly, consider talking with your pastor or a trusted teacher, reading self-help materials, downloading a therapy app, journaling, meditation or relaxation techniques, exercising, or therapy podcasts/videos.

If a loved one or friend says they’re going to kill themselves, but refuses help…

Call 911. If you’re with that person, stay with them until help arrives.

If you are thinking about or planning suicide…

Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline or Veterans Crisis Line. Alternatively, you can text HOME to 741741 to text with a trained crisis counselor. Call 911 if you think you might act. 

If you are grieving…

Check local hospitals and churches for grief support groups; some areas may have nonprofits that offer free services, such as Let Haven Help or Community Grief and Loss Center in Northern Virginia.

Additionally, a funeral home or hospice center may be able to provide resources.

If you are a veteran, you and your family should be able to access free counseling through the VA.

The Compassionate Friends offers support after the loss of a child. Call for a customized package of bereavement materials (at no charge) or find a support group (in-person or online).

GRASP is a grief and recovery support network for those who have lost a loved one through substance use. You can find suicide support groups using the American Association of Suicidology’s directory or the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s support group locator.

Hello Grief provides resources and education for children and adolescents who are grieving.

There are also online communities, forums, and support groups, including groups for suicide survivors such as Alliance of Hope and Parents of Suicides – Friends and Families of Suicides.

If you are a victim of sexual assault or domestic violence…

If you are sexually assaulted, call 911 or the National Sexual Assault Hotline at 1-800-656-4673 (or live chat). Find help and resources at National Sexual Violence Resource Center.

For male survivors of sexual abuse: MaleSurvivors.org

For domestic violence: The National Domestic Violence Hotline

For gender-based violence: VAWnet

For teen dating abuse: LoveIsRespect or Break The Cycle

LGBTQ: National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs for LGBT Communities

If you’re a victim of sex trafficking…

Access Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Trafficking or call National Human Trafficking Hotline at 1-888-373-7888 (or text 233733).

 

If you’re a victim of or stalking…

If you believe you are in immediate danger, call 911. Find help and info at Stalking Resource Center and Stalking Awareness Month.

 

If you can’t stop gambling…

Call or text the National Problem Gambling Helpline at 1-800-522-4700. Access screening tools and treatment at National Council on Problem Gambling. Attend a Gamblers Anonymous Group or other support group for problem gambling.

If you or a loved one has an eating disorder…

If you want to approach a loved one about his or her eating disorder, start by reading some guidelines (such as Helping Someone with an Eating Disorder from HelpGuide.org).

Contact the National Eating Disorders Helpline at 1-800-931-2237. (Alternatively, there’s a “live chat” option.) For support, resources, screening tools, and treatment options, explore the National Eating Disorder Association site.

Find support groups, recovery tools, and local treatment centers at Eating Disorder Hope.

Attend an Eating Disorders Anonymous meeting (in-person or online). You may also want to consider an Overeaters Anonymous meeting.

 

If you are engaging in self-harm and can’t stop…

Call 1-800-DONT-CUT or attend an online support group, such as Self Mutilators Anonymous.

Read personal stories, learn coping skills, and access resources at Self-injury Outreach and Support.

Join an online community like RecoverYourLife.com.

Try one of these 146 things to do instead of engaging in self-harm from the Adolescent Self Injury Foundation.

 

If you’re concerned about the drinking or drug use of a friend or family member, but they don’t want help…

If you’re considering staging an intervention, know that there’s little to no evidence to support the effectiveness of this tactic. 

Instead, read guidelines for approaching the issue (like What to Do If Your Adult Friend or Loved One Has a Problem with Drugs or How to Talk about Addiction). Learn everything that you can about addiction. Explore treatment centers in the area; if your loved one changes their mind, you’ll be prepared to help.

Explore Learn to Cope, a peer-led support network for families coping with the addiction of a loved one. Alternatively, you could attend Al-Anon or Nar-Anon.

Keep in mind that it’s almost impossible to help someone who doesn’t want it. You can’t control your loved one or force them into treatment. Instead, find a way to accept that there’s no logic to addiction; it’s a complex brain disorder and no amount of pleading, arguing, or “guilting” will change that.

If a friend or family member overdoses on heroin or other opioid…

Call 911 immediately.

How to recognize the signs of opiate overdose: Recognizing Opiate Overdose from Harm Reduction Coalition

You can receive free training to administer naloxone, which reverses an opioid overdose. Take an online training course at Get Naloxone Now. You can purchase naloxone OTC in most states at CVS or Walgreens.

For more information about how to respond to an opioid overdose, access SAMHSA’s Opioid Overdose Prevention Toolkit (for free).

 

If you want to quit smoking…

In addition to talking to your doctor about medication, the patch, and/or nicotine gum, visit Smoke FreeBe Tobacco Free, or Quit.com for resources, tools, and tips.

Call a smoking cessation hotline (like 1-800-QUIT-NOW) or live chat with a specialist, such as LiveHelp (National Cancer Institute).

Download a free app (like QuitNow! or Smoke Free) or sign up for a free texting program, like SmokefreeTXT, for extra support.

Attend an online workshop or participate in a smoking cessation course; your insurance provider may offer one or you may find classes at a local hospital or community center. You could also contact your EAP for additional resources.

If you or a loved one have a hoarding problem…

Read guidelines for approaching a hoarding issue with someone such as Hoarding: How to Help a Friend.

Learn more about hoarding and find help (support groups, treatment, etc.) at Hoarding: Help for Hoarding.

 

If your therapist is making unwanted sexual remarks/advances…

Contact the licensing board to file a complaint. Each state has a different licensing board. Additionally, contact the therapist’s professional association (i.e. American Counseling AssociationAmerican Psychological Association, etc.) Provide your name, address, and telephone number (unless filing anonymously). Identify the practitioner you are reporting by his or her full name and license type. Provide a detailed summary of your concerns. Attach copies (not originals) of documents relating to your concerns, if applicable.

Read NAMI’s How Do I File a Complaint against a Mental Health Care Facility or Professional?

 

If you want to take a confidential online assessment for mental health or substance use disorders…

Free and anonymous screenings: Screening for Mental Health, Inc. or Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance Mental Health Screening

For additional sites, self-help guides, literature, etc., check out the resource page.

If you know of a great resource, post in the comments below!


 

Free Online Academic Journals for Mental Health Professionals

Peer-reviewed scholarly journals you can access for free online. Access the latest research findings related to mental health, addiction, and wellness.

Compiled by Cassie Jewell, LPC, LSATP

Updated July 23, 2018

updated online journals.png

This list is comprised of 70+ academic journals that you can access online. Most of the journals are open-access; others offer limited access (with some free articles). All of the publications are related to mental health, addiction, or wellness. I use many of them for research for this blog. The research is relevant to all health professionals and to anyone who is interested in learning more about mental illness. 

Abnormal and Behavioural Psychology  
Addiction Science and Clinical Practice  
Addictive Behavior Reports
Addictive Behaviors  
Aggression and Violent Behavior  
Alcohol and Alcoholism
Alcohol Research: Current Reviews
The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Annals of Behavioural Science  
Behavior and Brain Functions
Bipolar Disorder 
BMC Neuroscience 
BMC Psychology 
Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Regulation
Brain: A Journal of Neurology
Brain and Cognition 
Brain Disorders and Therapy 
The British Journal of Psychiatry
Clinical Depression 
Clinical Psychology Review 
Cognition
Cognitive Psychology
Consciousness and Cognition
Culture and Psychology
Current Opinion in Psychology
Current Psychology Letters: Behaviour, Brain, & Cognition
Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Dual Diagnosis 
Emotion Review
Electronic Journal of Research in Educational Psychology
European Journal of Trauma and Disassociation
Harm Reduction Journal 
Health Psychology Open 
International Journal of Mental Health and Psychiatry 
JAMA Internal Medicine
Journal of Abnormal Psychology
Journal of Addictive Behaviors, Therapy, & Rehabilitation 
Journal of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse 
Journal of Anxiety Disorders
Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis
Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry
Journal of Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders
Journal of Depression and Anxiety 
Journal of Drug Abuse 
Journal of Eating Disorders 
Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 
Journal of Human Values 
Journal of Interpersonal Violence 
Journal of Mental Disorders and Treatment 
The Journal of Neuroscience
Journal of Psychological Abnormalities
Journal of Psychology and Psychotherapy  
Journal of Sleep Disorders and Therapy 
Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment 
Journal of Traumatic Stress Disorders & Treatment 
Learning & Memory
Mental Health and Physical Activity
New Ideas in Psychology
Nicotine & Tobacco Research 
Nutrition Journal 
Personality and Individual Differences
PsyArt Journal
Punishment and Society
Schizophrenia Bulletin
Sleep
Sleep Science and Practice 
Social Media + Society 
Social Psychological and Personality Science 
Substance Abuse: Research and Treatment 
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy 
Theory & Psychology 
Thinking Skills and Creativity
Tobacco Use Insights

Please contact me if you have a suggestion or if a link is not working!

Free Online Education for Mental Health Professionals

A list of online education courses and trainings for mental health clinicians (some offering free CEs!)

Compiled by Cassie Jewell, LPC

 

updated online education.png

Are you looking to expand your clinical knowledge or do you need CEs to renew your license? In-person workshops and seminars are ideal for learning up-to-date practices and the latest research, but they’re often expensive and/or require travel. And while there are plenty of online programs that offer CEs, most charge a fee.

The following list is comprised of sites that offer free online courses and webinars. Please note that only a few of the sites offer CEs. However, all of the courses offer opportunities to grow as a clinician and expand your knowledge.

6-Module DBT Course

An educational course designed for professionals to learn the basic principles for the diagnosis and treatment of borderline personality disorder. There are six 20-minute modules.

The American Institute of Stress

The AIS Learning Center offers videos and online courses.

American Society of Addiction Medicine

Addiction medicine webinars

Anxiety and Depression Association of America

Free monthly webinars. You can access archived webinars. You can also watch a six-part series for professionals on treating anxiety disorders.

Battered Women’s Justice Project

Access recorded webinars on sexual violence prevention and policy.

Brain & Behavior Research Foundation

A variety of webinars. (Sign up for the newsletter to be notified when new webinars are available.)

CDC Train

Over 1,000 public health training opportunities, many offering free CEs. Create an account to access a variety of online courses.

Eating Disorders HOPE

View recorded webinars on topics related to eating disorders.

FUTURES Without Violence

View recorded webinars on topics relating to violence against women and children.

Healthy Minds

A public television series on mental health (and ending stigma)

Homeless Resource Center

A SAMHSA site. Register to access free trainings on topics related to homelessness and behavioral health. Free CEUs offered for NAADAC after passing the post-course quiz.

Indiana Prevention Resources Center

Webinars and online modules on drug education and treatment. You must register to access the courses. Free CEUs.

Institute for Research, Education, and Training in Addictions

Web-based training (webinars and online courses) on addiction and recovery topics. Free CEUs for NAADAC and Social Work.

International Society for Bipolar Disorders

Free webinars. The site also offers videos and tools for clinicians.

Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy

IPSRT is an evidence-based treatment for bipolar disorder. With registration, this course offers a free 8-hour online training.

Knowledge Application Program (KAP) E-Learning

A SAMHSA site with free courses for mental health professionals. CEUs offered for NAADAC. You must register to access the trainings.

Magellan Health E-Learning Center

Professional learning opportunities. Many of the continuing education courses offer free CEs approved by the following organizations: APA, ASWB, NBCC, and NAADAC.

Massachusetts General Hospital Psychiatry Academy

Free education (CE credits) for mental health, primary care, and nursing professionals. Create a free account to access online learning programs.

Mental Health America

Recorded webinars on various mental health topics

Mental Health Professionals’ Network

Australia-based site. Webinars on topics ranging from complicated grief, complex trauma, anxiety, LGBT issues, and more.

Mental Health Recovery

On-demand webinars on using WRAP – Wellness and Recovery Action Plan.

Military Cultural Competence – Free Online Course

75-minute interactive course

NAADAC

Webinars on addiction

National Center for PTSD

Training materials, online courses, information, and tools for professionals

National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma, and Mental Health

Free webinars and seminars. (You must register for the webinars.) The site also provides free toolkits and other resources.

National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare

Sign up for free online tutorials. (An access key will be sent via email you register.) CEUs offered for NAADAC professionals.

The National Child Traumatic Stress Center Network: TheLearning Center

Online courses and webinars on childhood trauma. CE’s for social workers, counselors, and psychologists

National Council for Behavioral Health

Webinars on various topics related to behavioral health

National Institute of Mental Health

The multimedia section has a variety of webinars and recorded series.

National Institute on Drug Abuse

Videos and CE opportunities

National LGBT Health Education Center

Free webinars on LGBT health issues

National Resource Center for Mental Health Promotion & Youth Violence Prevention

Access the learning portal for online learning modules and webinars, along with supporting materials and related resources.

National Sexual Violence Resource Center

Online learning campus

Pathways to Positive Futures (Research and Training Center)

Pathways aims to improve the lives of young people with severe mental illness. Register for upcoming webinars or access previous webinars on-demand.

PsychArmor

Free courses on military cultural competence, PTSD, combat stress, and other related issues.

SOAR Works! (SOAR Online Course)

A free 20-hour course with seven comprehensive classes that teaches how to navigate the SSI/SSDI application process with clients with mental illness, who are at risk of homelessness, have a medical impairment, or a co-occurring disorder. CEUs offered for NASW.

Stalking Resource Center

Archived webinars

Suicide Prevention Resource Center

Online courses on suicide prevention

YMSM & LGBT

Access archived webinars on topics related to treatment services for the lesbian, gay, and transgender population. You can also access a monthly webinar series held on the 4th Friday of each month. CEs may be offered.

Zero Suicide

Readings, tools, videos, and webinars


Updated May 5, 2018

 

 

If you know of a site that offers free courses or trainings, please list in the comments section!